Get Shameless About Money

#269 BONUS: Dyalekt featured on Caribbean Rhythms Radio HIP HOP FINFEST 2023

June 08, 2023 Brunch & Budget
Get Shameless About Money
#269 BONUS: Dyalekt featured on Caribbean Rhythms Radio HIP HOP FINFEST 2023
Show Notes Transcript

In this special episode, Dyalekt gets interviewed on Caribbean Rhythms Radio Network about Hip Hop FinFest 2023

Unknown:

You want to know that's why saw right there blessing messenger never ever failed me yet never, never ever failed me yet. Well, without further ado. I'm gonna welcome our guests. We have two amazing guests. As I said before, we're gonna be talking about the hip hop fin fest that is coming up shortly this month. We spoke with a young man last year named dialect and had a great conversation and we're also going to be joined today with Queen heroine. So please, ladies and gentlemen, help me welcome. We welcome dialect and Queen heroine to the show. Good morning, you both. Good morning. Good morning. Good morning. Good morning. Well, welcome to Caribbean rhythms radio network. We're so glad to have y'all this morning. And we're so excited to talk about the second annual Hip Hop fin fest. Are y'all excited?

Dyalekt:

Oh, we just got in the student submissions. And we got to pour through all of these songs. I'm excited. Like we How you feeling?

Unknown:

I'm definitely excited. There's no question these kids, you know, money. Hip hop was better than that. Absolutely makes it to work. But before we get into the details, let, I'll open the floor for you both just to explain. I know last year, um, dialect we had you on talking about hip hop fan fest, but just remind the listeners exactly what is the fin Fest and the goal of it.

Dyalekt:

Most of them was definitely Yeah, so the hip hop fin fest is a song competition where students 12 to 18 junior high and high school kids get free online lessons about personal finance, they get to go through these lessons learn about that there's lessons also on how to write a song and how to record a song by legends and hip hop, and beats made by other kids. And what we invite students to do is check out the lessons, find the things that resonate with you that you feel that means something to you. And then when you have an idea that you want to share with the world, get one of those beads made by other students and make a song we have legends in the hip hop game legends in the business world who come and evaluate the songs and give out prizes. The competition itself isn't the important part of it. It's the building community bringing people around sharing these things. The reason why we started this hip hop interest is you know, as of this month, I will have been a hip hop educator for 20 years and one month.

Unknown:

We gotta clap for you on that one. Congratulations.

Dyalekt:

Thank you, I appreciate that are you gonna try try to be better about bragging my things. But you know,

Unknown:

I know you're humble. I've been in classrooms for

Dyalekt:

years. And as a hip hop educator, just to let folks know a little bit about it, it doesn't necessarily mean that we're going to be rapping or dancing or DJing. With the kids. It's often the needs, for building for creating community for destroying the hierarchical systems that are keeping us from being able to learn and finding ways to reach students where they're at. Sometimes that involves doing the music stuff, sometimes it doesn't. And oftentimes, we will shy away from it, because we want it to prove our legitimacy to these schools and organizations and principles. But the thing that we've found is the biggest barrier to financial education is not necessarily bad financial education, it's the common sense out there. Common sense will tell you not to check your own credit score. Because if you check your credit score, the credit score will go down. That's not true. But I know you've spoken to someone in your life who has told you that well, you may have thought that yourself and you're not wrong or stupid or a loan for thinking that that has been pushed on it that has become common sense. And the only way the best way to change common sense is through art. Cats didn't start dressing like the the Wall Street executives with slicked back hair and pinstripe suits, until the movie Wall Street, cats will follow the things that these folks share. So we invite the students once they've learned the real about finance, once they've gone through the myth, so they can share with their community what the real is so that we can change what common sense is

Unknown:

come on now. And Queen Erin, I know. You know, we weren't able to speak with you last year. So I'm glad to have you this year. I know you are. And hip hop artists as well. Let us know a little bit about your background in music and hip hop as well. Absolutely. And it's an honor to be here with you guys. In addition, and I think this is something really important that many people don't know because of what dialect was just saying this idea of shying away from exploring or sharing both aspects. So I've been an educator as well for about 120 years as well or on and off not as consistently but I've been in the education system as well. I come from a family of educators, a mother's a retired educator, my brothers both teach in the Bronx. And so education and hip hop is something that has never really been totally separated from my experience, I think, because of different societal expectations. We tended to separate it before many years ago. And so just recently, I would say In the last 510 years where, you know, we're finally starting to have this important discussion, this is why platforms like this are so important and critical, just for growth. Because you know, our children and our communities, they don't separate. This is about lifestyle and culture, and who we are. And so it's a blessing to be able to navigate both spaces as an MC and an educator, comfortably. But I've been writing since I was 12. As far as the MC aspect. I've been teaching since I was about 21. And so I feel very fluid. I've had students tell me you don't sound like a teaching sound like a rapper in class. That happened a couple of months ago, and I was like, I am a rap. Yeah. They were like, just it all like, Whoa, yeah, this, you know, just kind of changes your perspective, a little. Yes, no, it's a beautiful thing. Because ultimately, as I said, a moment ago, it's really about community and community is about connection. And so it's finding ways to connect with our students, with families as well, through the things that bring us all together. And Hip Hop and education, certainly is that music and education to certainly that, you know, just like, as you said, dialect, it's it's meeting the children where they are writing, and then guiding them from where they are as well. And, you know, I know, we both know, but as the listeners were sharing that this year is also hip hop's 50th anniversary. And come on, I mean, what a what a great time to what a great way to also celebrate hip hop. So what you know, what is? How does that connect? And how does that impact the Finn Fest this year, knowing that we're celebrating 50 years of hip hop?

Dyalekt:

You know, I'll say quickly that the first thing for me that I think of is it this is a reminder that hip hop is not a fad. Hip hop is not quote unquote, youth culture, or some new thing or some random thing. This is something that at this point, it probably is grandparent age, and the roots of it stretch so much farther back. It always feels it always feels like you're trying to tear it down when people are like, Oh, this is youth culture. This is just like some thing that sprung up and, and has no real roots. And just looking at the deep roots that hip hop has in New York alone as it stretches out to the Caribbean, those of us who came up in the Caribbean and the Caribbean roots of a lot of the elements and styles. It shows that it reminds us of how valid this culture and this mode of music of art of learning really is in the society, how it's like probably, you know, that jazz, but that stuff that America has made?

Unknown:

Oh, yes. You know, I, I guess I can add into I guess I'm part of the the educator crew. Now. I know, I'm an elementary school music teacher, I just recently got into the business. Thank you. I'm part of the club now. But you know, we actually not back in our Black History Month, we were talking about hip hop, actually. And I said, you know, guys, this is the 50th year for hip hop. And we started discussing, especially with my fourth graders, we started discussing, you know, how hip hop is so influential to all of the music. I mean, that we listened that they listened to today, you know, some of the the academy OG hip hop artists, you know, I was sharing them and they're like, you know, I said, these without these pioneers of hip hop, the music you enjoy today, it might not be that same and, you know, they were just so in awe in it. It's just so great to be able to share hip hop. And like you said, you know, so many people have tried to tear hip hop down or, or put negative connotation to it. But hip hop is a reflection of of our culture. It's a reflection of our life. And I love that Finn fest uses hip hop and that you both in your education and in your lives. You use hip hop to tell our culture to tell the story and to educate our people. I also noticed that this year, the theme for the fin fest, it's connecting financial literacy so hip hop fin fez wants our needs to can you explain a little bit about the focus and the theme of this year's Fan Fest?

Dyalekt:

Yeah, this one is really important to me. This one matters a lot to me. I have been spending a lot of my time you know, I didn't start out as a hip hop and finance educator. I was teaching literacy, self efficacy, poetry, all sorts of different things. And about six or seven years I joined in the finance space. So I've been doing all this research, going to conferences, learning about behavioral finance, the psychology behind it, and the biggest thing that I've learned is that You'll never stick to a budget you don't believe in. If stuff doesn't matter if you you know, you know, when you get a budget, they tell you Okay, well, you got to you got to pay your rent. So you got to take that out and then you got to take out for your phone, you got to take out for your groceries. And after that, put it all away, go sleep on a rock live, literally sparklingly have nothing, you're 65 You'll be rich, right? You're not gonna do that. Not only is that like, it's a terrible way to live, right? We don't want to actually live like that right now. But also our brains and bodies aren't wired like that, it ain't gonna work. So what we found is when we engage young folks, grown folks, and you know, we work with adults to about what matters to you. What do you want to spend energy? What do you want to spend time on? What do you want to spend money on, that makes life worth living, that makes you want to get up in the morning that makes you ready to save money and not spend on random advertisements that are calling after you because you have some purpose, something that matters to you. And it can be something that is grand, and for the community and saving the people or it can be like that small thing you like, the way you get your hair done, the snacks you eat with your friends, good feelings that are created through that are what builds your savings muscle, your savings and spendings are connected. And rather than telling people to only spend on your needs, which is a faulty way to go, we have to understand that our wants or needs too, they're important. And when you find what's important to you, then everything else will fall into place,

Unknown:

man, come on now. Quick Queen heroine, do you have anything you'd like to add to that? Or any kind of can do? Well, when Queen Aaron, in your education, what was it that you? You saw? I think you might have said it, but what was it that you were teaching? Um, it's been a range of things over the years, I started out actually teaching pre K many years ago, oh, Lord, introduction, he was into pre K. And I was there for a couple of years in Mount Vernon with a private owned business, black owned businesses were talking about, you know, just finances and entrepreneurship. And from there, I went into special education. And I taught special education for quite a few years as well. That was a really insightful experience. It put me on to a lot. Yeah, as a matter of fact, I ended up going back into the visual arts because of that experience. Just because, you know, I realized there was so many students that I was connecting to that I felt like I could connect to on a deeper level. As a matter of fact, one of my students there actually knew about a compilation, there's this lounge I had done years ago, and it caused an issue. And it was an interesting thing, when when you talk about that the disconnect, again, between just education at the time and hip hop. But anyway, so special education. I taught in Chicago, I taught visual arts in Chicago, K through 12. And then I currently teach Yeah, currently an adjunct professor at Monroe college, and I was in Mount Vernon teaching Visual Arts to about a month ago. So I fully made the transition, I guess, out of the classroom fully, but not but but not away from education. Because my connection with the hip hop Education Center. They're in the capacity of a curriculum, the chief curriculum officers, so we do curriculum and how we can connect curriculum to hip hop and, and furthering education and developing additional bonds through you know, just so many different resources of places. It's endless. It's beyond just the classroom and traditional sense of learning. So, yeah, I've done some teaching. You've been all been through there, girl, you've been through this? Well, I mean, you know, we were kind of talking about it. But I guess I want to dive, you know, just let you that you both be able to dive a little deeper. You know, how, how do you feel that hip hop, and in your own personal ways to how hip hop can promote a prosperous future for our leaders for tomorrow, and you can even share how hip hop even helped you get to help you both get to where you are today, in your own personal prosperity in your own personal growth.

Dyalekt:

I mean, you know, hip hop is why I teach. I was growing. I was living on St. Croix, I think I was 1617 years old. And I had written one rap. I just had written one rap and my I showed it to my friend and acting class. He was like I got a rap group and he brought me back to his spot little studio and we did some raps and we would listen to the only rap that we would get because there was also you know, Soca Calypso, reggae on the island, you know, maybe some pop music but they didn't really play no rap. Only the wakeup show at 10pm and I found out from rich nice because he has been involved and and suede who was one of our other judges that that's because rich nice is from St. John. And so you know, he had that connection to come on down and they would play it at 10pm. And we would listen to it outside this mountain and we would rap. And I, when I went to New York, I investigated everything about hip hop, I went to Crotona Park, I checked out the B boy jams, I was looking at the scribble jam and went to all of these things. And I wondered, why did I care so much about this history and culture and community and I didn't care as much about my studies, what was being done wrong there. And I dug into the way that hip hop engages folks, and sought to engage young people in the same way. And that built my entire career as an educator. So in terms of being able to influence things, this is the stuff that we've been able to take back that we've lost, you know, when people say about how, you know, from African ancestors, the drums were taken away. This is the place where we're able to put the drums back into things and make things make sense. I was not great at math until I started rhyming. And then I swear to you, I got a perfect score on my math SATs. Makes sense? Because the rhythms worked out. And when we can connect our personal rhythms, to the rhythms of the community at large, we will be able to hear everything like on the stuff that I'm saying may sound like hippie dippie to some folks, but I'll give you an actual practical teacher, kid or teach yourself how to rap in the most basic way. Right one rep. Do one freestyle, and then go listen to Shakespeare and tell me if you can't understand what they're saying. 1,000,000% better than before when it just all sounded like a mess. Yeah,

Unknown:

I needed that. I needed that. That advice back in high school dialect. Where were you when I was reading Shakespeare? I couldn't understand the King Lear for dummies.

Dyalekt:

I was doing that I used to do that session with young folks will slip it into anyway. Yeah,

Unknown:

no. But that makes complete sense. It does. And Queen heron, you're from New York. Correct. I'm from New York. So it was embedded in me. But up to the other day dialect. The last guest today even we're speaking just you know, in preparation for this wonderful meet up. We were talking about you know, the Caribbean is not far at all. For me. My mother's from Jamaica, okay. And my father is a trainee from San Fernando. And we have family in Port of Spain. So for us, it's been an interesting relationship because there's the Caribbean roads. And that was home as soon as we opened the door and came in up to yesterday, my mother was like, what are you what are you bringing for Easter Sunday? Somebody planted ourselves. Yeah, I don't know. But I'll bring something you know. It's not at all far. This is who we are. But growing up as a child, myself, our family, you know, we were in the northeast part of the Bronx. So anytime you mentioned White Plains Road rockin tones, all those things is like, you know, that's what's in the anvil there that that was that home, you know, and so there's there those roots. And then you're also we, you know, we went to school on VHS that avenue and so it was like you come out is eating well, this slick. Rick, there's, you know, literally lick Rick lived in the neighborhood. Wow. And so you had this dichotomy, or we had this dichotomy of the roots of our of our culture, from a Caribbean background, and then the roots of our culture growing up in the Bronx, as young kids. Yeah. And so that fusion was very unique to us and influential. And then I had, you know, one of my cousins in Jamaica, it's interesting, when you look at just from an educational standpoint, he had turntables in the crib, he was fortunate enough to have that in Jamaica, he'd be playing spinning, you know, mixing back and forth. Biggie. And I remember I remember him specifically taking a finance course. And he's a he's one year younger than me. But this was in like, very, very early high school. And I remember thinking to myself, and my education, we didn't have, we didn't have any finance courses. And when you just think about from a curriculum standpoint, he's now an entrepreneur, and he's an amazing entrepreneur. And so when you look at, you know, this conversation of literacy, infuse into education from very early on and how it sets a tone and creates a platform for just Futurism and, and movement and activism through finances. It's very, very powerful. And so, you know, again, this, this conversation about hip hop in education I think it's something that should have been had long ago but thank god or thank goodness for you know, I mean, dialect just listen to listening to him talking, it's like I'm over here, ready bars. I'm over here creating my new birth. That was so poetic. Wait, let me go back to number six. I literally, it's truly about inspiring each other. It's truly about having these conversations. And and finding your purpose. I think there was so many key things that he said feeling good, and the ways that you're, you know, investing in what you're investing in that that term itself investment, we often type of tend to think of investment, whether it's just a bond, or a property. And yes, absolutely. So when you think about investing in yourself that first that first pillar, and how that creates a whole trajectory for how you're going to live your life and what you will spend your money in and how it's really critical. Yeah, and, you know, I'm grateful, as you both say that I'm grateful for you both and for this for this entire fin fest, because, you know, and even you, given the example of your cousin of how now he's such a successful entrepreneur, and how that financial class he took, you know, was a great trajectory into his future. And, you know, I being in in education, now, I realize, you know, we really have to put so much into these youth and, and try to educate them as best because they really are the future and they really are the next ones who will take over and make change, and if we don't impact them now, you know, how do we get them later? And how do we get them back later? So, you know, the fin fest is such an amazing thing, and I'm so glad that it's been put on, I don't know if dilated, if you can just give us a quick background of how it even I know this is a second year, but how did it get started last year and continuing to this year?

Dyalekt:

Yeah, yeah, most definitely. So this started out as a collaboration with this group FPP they were known as Florida prosperity partnership, and now they're going more nationwide. They started this financial literacy channel or financial education channel and they were moving away from literacy. It's not really great for our peoples like that, trying to say that we can't read money but anyway, this is financial education. I'm sidebar, you know, financial education channel, called spawn doulas, it's I dig it because it's an old Greek slang term for money like in I don't know, like way like hundreds of years ago, Greek kids used to call money spawned doula acts as like the cool thing. So they've got this channel and they do this great financial education Film Festival, where it's Narrative Short films that are about money things. One that I remember that really impacted me there was this one about Japanese internment camps. And it was this five minute short, where it was this funeral for this white guy. And there was a Japanese guy sitting in the back this really old Japanese cat. And as he was coming up, he was flashing back to when the Japanese were interred. A lot of white people took their houses. And what this guy did, he was a neighbor of so I'm saying the ethnicity is because of what's going on. This white guy was a neighbor of this Japanese man. And he bought his house for $1, promising that he would sell it back to him when he got out. And he kept his word. So this was the guy come in at the end, just like really powerful, beautiful things. And my wife, co founder of pockets change. Pamela Capella, and I were invited to host one year and we kicked a few lessons about what the shows are talking about in between. And then Bill Mills, who runs FTP hit me up, he was like, why don't we do a music version? Why don't we do a hip hop version of this? And you can get some indie cats will get like some big names. And I was like, Yeah, that's cool. Let's do it. I'm with it. We'll have a battle all this stuff. And I was like, but what about getting some of the students in? He was like, okay, we can get some students and I kept talking about stuff, you know, already how I am. So, by the end of the conversation, this was entirely a student program. And then they were excited about it. It went really well. The first year, I think we had over 3000 people who watched it live decent for this brand new channel, the way that things went a lot of great submissions, wonderful, wonderful finalists, and we've been able to continue to build with we got, you know, we put this together with the HIPAA Basic Education Center with here for good Texas, morphing minds like really wonderful organizations that we've been able to build with and continue the mentorship for these students. I mean, our winner from last year is currently enrolled in college at Rock nation College, used her interest when as part of her audition to get into the school. Wow, we've been able to continue to build with her, you know, so all of this made us really excited about how this can be. We're calling it like our Super Bowl. We're always working with kids and with adults and with teachers and with families about finance, but this gives us the ability to center. A lot of stuff to finish the season to To give students the ability to share what's going on their minds, not just once, but every year, see how it's growing. You know, we're bringing in some new elements, we've been able to open it up to middle school kids opening it up to the Caribbean to Canada. My goal in the next few years is to make this something that is not only worldwide, but is respective of all the hip hop elements. I want to bring my beat boxers, and my dancers and my visual artists in there. So we can do all modes of expression, y'all know that, you know, getting the words on the beats is the easiest lift for educators and students. So that's the thing we're starting with. I know, rappers always take center stage. And no, we're not supposed to. We're part of the hip hop circle. But we got that tendency. I'm just, you know, stating the intention that, you know, this is how this is going. And the way that it's growing is into all of these modes of learning. So everybody is able to rock in every way they can.

Unknown:

Why, but dialect, what do you be speaking it sounds like poetry all the time boy. No, but I mean, I'm so excited to hear, you know how well it went last year and the growth that you see. And and, you know, I'm super excited. Well, let's let let let the listeners know, how are they able to? When will it be? And how are they able to connect and be a part? And watch this? Because I think the submission date is already over. You already have your submissions from your students. So how are we able when and where can we tune in?

Dyalekt:

Gotcha. So yes, the will be on spawn, do licks.org That's SB o n d u l i c s. I know it's a longer but I think it's fun. It's an old slang word.org. On April 27, I think it begins at 7pm. I think the time is Eastern, but just check on spanoulis.org If you go to spawn deluxe.org Right now, you will be able to register so that you can get and you know, it'll put you on the Eventbrite so you can get all this stuff. So it'll remind you, you can also look at all of the stuff going on, on hip hop pin test.com, you can check out all of the info about prizes, the stuff that the students are submitting, you can check out the judges, there's a lot of really great info there, we can see all of the good stuff that's going on. And yeah, that's how you can check everything out. If you have any questions, you know, holler at us.

Unknown:

I'm on there, I'm on Spawn Deluxe. I went on Spawn dudes that are connect me to hip hop fin fan. So I'm gonna, I'm gonna register myself. Looking forward to it. Oh, wow. You know, I really believe it's gonna be, you know, I truly believe in it. And I think like you said, each year, it's just gonna grow and grow and impact so much, so many people. And, you know, I truly believe that you will be able to see the fruits of this labor, right, you will be able to see the fruits of this labor to come when we look at the generations who are now submitting and being a part. And then in the future, we see how they grow and how they're amazing people. So you know, I'm fully supporting it. I'm so happy. I was got a bigger tray, Mr. Trey Brown, I was gonna beat him up for this great connection. Yes, so I really think it's a great time. Well, you know, I just want to as we wrap up, I want to give you guys a floor just to share anything else that you'd like to share or say to the listeners, the floors are yours, whatever you'd like to share.

Dyalekt:

Or I'll try to be quick on mine. So the Queen was talking about inspiration earlier, and I said something that sparked her and she wanted to run and you know, one thing I want us to remember about this hip hop stuff is that it shows us the way that it really works. The Internet, I think is democratizing it a bit. But you know, we respond to art with art. It's a thing that we use to communicate rather than a thing we used to put on a pedestal. Remember that the actual denotative meaning of inspiration is to breathe in. Were given each other breaths so that we all can move a little bit better.

Unknown:

I didn't know that. Amen. Amen. queen, queen, heroine, you want to add a bot, you want to add a verse on there? What do you say after that? Exhale, and at this point, you know, that is just a deep exhale after that. I mean, I'm gonna go light my candle and meditate. Right? Yeah, no, I mean, again, it's just an honor to be on this platform, that there's nothing too much to add to that other than gratitude for spaces like this, to make these connections. I think that the one thing that I would say in connection to education perhaps is just after 20 years and this is you know, with all of us collectively and you in the in space now, teaching music is that it's imperative for us to understand that in order to connect with our students, you know, just remember that they learned in so many different ways and This is why, you know, not just hip hop, but just music in general, dance kinesthetic, all the things like we take in information. And so many different ways we process it sometimes in other ways. And then we give it back in other ways. And sometimes those ways are saying sometimes they're similar and they're, they're connected. And sometimes they're, you know, you may take in visually and then need to exhale, you know, through through the body, you know, breakdancing or something like that breaking. So I think it's just so important to understand that it's not linear. It's not one dimensional, there's so many layers, as educators. And as far as also awareness, being aware of who you are as a learner, for those educators, and how you that affects your teaching style, and then who your students are and how they take in information process and how they give it back. So there's so much to this, but having the arts as an additional way, as an essential way to really connect. And be yourselves. You know, the, what I realized is, as soon as I embraced this sense of all the parts of who I am, as an emcee, as an educator, as a mother, as a visual artist, the better. And educator I became, the better I was able to connect to connect with people and just open additional platforms like this. So don't compartmentalize who you are, embrace all parts, and just find a way to vote on it. Find a way to put it all together, so that you can really, really truly work and serve in your purpose. Amen, amen. All right, you hit that verse to girl you hit. Yes, and we're speaking from a real place is what we know what we love what we do. And so it's easy to speak freely about what we live, you know? Yeah. And, you know, as Alex said, You respond with art and respond with art with art. And, you know, and as you said, Queen heron, you know, we, there are so many compartments of each person, right? We all have so many talents and gifts that, you know, sometimes we, we try to hide a piece of it or think, you know, maybe this is not good enough, but, you know, and not to not share the beliefs, but you know, I gotta bring it in, you know, God has given each and every one of us. He's given us everything that we need to fulfill our destiny and our purpose and we can't like you said, we can't hide anything. We got to use every element that is within us because it's such a blessing to the world. You know, I think sometimes the world is waiting on us to be ourselves so we can bless Yes, bless the children, bless those around us. So, you know, y'all it's been such a great conversation today. I'm so grateful that you took time out of your day to come and talk with me and come on Caribbean rhythms radio network. And you know, we just wish you all the best. You are always welcome here we are your family, you are welcome. And we look forward to seeing April 27 on Spawn do licks.org Or you can go to hip hop fin fest.com Get registered. So we look forward to seeing you all and hearing from you and seeing all those submissions from your amazing children hearing what's in store so just lastly before I let you go is there a way that the listeners could connect to you on your you on your social media platforms or stay connected with you both?

Dyalekt:

Oh, yeah, most definitely. So for me you can check out the organization is pockets pockets with an S pockets change is actually a Gertrude Stein quote about money. So it's pockets change.com Or at pockets change anywhere My name dialect is spelled dy A L E k t because you know we got to be spelling things with a y and a que rather than an eye and a C so that at most places dialect.com You can catch me but you can go through the pocket change stuff you'll be able to see me as well.

Unknown:

And Queen Yes yes. For myself you can go to add the Queen heroine spelled s looks at different spellings. And the Queen heroine spelled H E R A w i n you can find me there on Instagram you can also find me at the Juggernaut shout out to my brother threes brewing and fever the kids so at the juggernauts which is a family hip hop group. Ju GGAK and OTs and of course at hip hop Education Center shout out to market D as the founder and CEO for good lager. Yes, yes, shout out Martha and also we have to shout fresh, bold and so deaf also connected to hip hop education, but specifically centered with women. So you can find me at any one of those platforms.

Dyalekt:

I got to point out real quick with the spelling of her name, hero when the H E R A w i n you know that It spells out her

Unknown:

a win win. salutely Yeah, look for the people winning. Come on, come through. I love it. I went, I was already following dialect, but I went and followed you. So we can stay connected. But you know, thank you all so much again, thank you for what you do and education of what you do in the arts. You know, it's so inspiring, especially to me being a new educator just to hear your stories yet. It ain't easy. Now. I ain't gonna say it's easy now, Lord, help me. But

Dyalekt:

we got to I want to come play for what your fourth graders I ain't got to rock with fourth graders in a minute.

Unknown:

I love you know, fourth grade, because I teach K through K through fifth, fourth grade, I've got to say, I really love them, because they're at that age where they're old enough to, you know, have great conversations, but they still are young enough where they respected the fifth graders now Lord helped me with a fifth grade. Now the loads, we know, we know. You're doing the work, though. Yes. And I really, you know, it really helps me respect edgy educators so much, because you know, it isn't easy. But at the end of the day, you know, when you when you leave, and you pack up and you're packing up your computer, you say, You know what, today was a good day, you know, we made an impact and to see the kids be happy to learn, and when we play stuff on the instruments, and they're like, Look, Miss, I can do it. I'm like, Yes, you can change your life. So, you know, sending all my love to you. And I look forward to I'm gonna, I'm registering. And I'm definitely going to be a part of the fin Fest this year. So wishing you all the best. And thank you again, so much for joining us today. Thank you. Thank you. So appreciate you guys. All right, well, take care you enjoy the rest of your weekend. All righty. Take care y'all. Wowzers Wowzers what a conversation. Ah, thank you again to dialect and Queen Harrow. When Hip Hop fin fest. You can come on, it's not too late to register April 27. Let's be a part of this historical movement that is happening in education in hip hop, and in our literacy, financial literacy and education. So make sure you visit Hip Hop fin says.com. You can register there. And then also you can watch on April 27 at spawn Dhulikhel SP ONDULIC s.com April 27. After that great conversation. Y'all do not want to miss it. We're going to just take a quick commercial break as we wrap up this segment, and we're gonna be welcoming Mr. John Perry. He's been to Canada this morning. All right. So we're looking forward to having him but we will be right back. After this quick commercial break