Brunch & Budget

b&b 220: How art and culture prop up the Racial Wealth Divide

March 24, 2020 Brunch & Budget
Brunch & Budget
b&b 220: How art and culture prop up the Racial Wealth Divide
Chapters
Brunch & Budget
b&b 220: How art and culture prop up the Racial Wealth Divide
Mar 24, 2020
Brunch & Budget
In part two of How the Racial Wealth Divide Affects Your Wallet Pamela and Dyalekt continue the conversation on how the racial wealth divide affects your wallet, financial resilience and the policies that have led to the racial wealth divide and dive deeper into how those policies actually were perpetuated by art media and culture.Music […]
Show Notes Transcript
In part two of How the Racial Wealth Divide Affects Your Wallet Pamela and Dyalekt continue the conversation on how the racial wealth divide affects your wallet, financial resilience and the policies that have led to the racial wealth divide and dive deeper into how those policies actually were perpetuated by art media and culture.Music […]
Dyalekt :

Just like hot cheetos and hot takes justice is best served on a hot plate. Welcome to brunch and budget the show about personal finance and racial economic inclusion with your host, Pamela Capaled. A certified financial planner and accredited financial counselor here to take the bite out of your budget. Recording live from green house studios in East New York, stick them. Stick them. Brunch your budget is part of the race and wealth network. Im' your sound provider dialect and here's your host, Pamela Capaled.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Thank you, Dyalekt. And thank you everybody for tuning in today. So last week, we talked about how the racial wealth divide affects your wallet. And we really talked about financial resilience and the policies that have led to the racial wealth divide. But today we want to talk about... we're gonna do a part two, because we didn't really get to how these policies actually were perpetuated by art, media and culture. Because that's how this stuff happens. That's how we let this stuff slide right? The policy happens underneath the surface, and the narrative and the story that's told above the surface is what really gets us to where we are today.

Dyalekt :

I remember an online social media conversation where someone was talking about companies and individual actors that were doing terrible things, you know, some class action lawsuits, and folks who had done bad things to the environment. People who've done things to poor people and gotten folks killed and all that. Someone was responding to them being like, don't worry about it. They're going to get their's in the end, karma is going to get them. For the most part, people err toward the side of good and good people, usually win. Then the response to them was a long list of the atrocities done by these individuals, and talking about how they were in their 70s. So it was too late for them to get theirs. That's, you know, they'd already lived a full life.

Unknown Speaker :

I mean, talk about like art and culture. One of my favorite movies, "It's a Wonderful Life" got a ton of backlash because it was too real about the richest man in town. Mr. Potter, right, that was the town villain. He was the richest man in town. He owned most of the buildings. He was trying to put the savings loan on a business, whatever it was, and he never got his comeuppance. And one of the reasons why that movie wasn't popular is because they didn't want to spread the idea that rich villainous, millionaires or whatever it is, don't ever really get what's coming to them. Yeah, well, usually in the story, the villain reaches some sort of cartoonish end. One that's not necessarily even realistic, but it's satisfying. So you let it slide because it's the thing that you want to happen. We understand that art a lot of times is the fantasy, right? It's the thing that we want to happen even though it's not happening. A lot of people don't enjoy since they go through their daily life with the rich person who takes over the town. If that happens. In real life, you normally don't have a recourse. So they wanted to see some sort of version. But the thing that happens is when we only get the fantasy part of it, then that becomes our reality. We have this false understanding of a lot of industries. You know, we always joke about how cops can't watch cop shows, right? Yeah, because everything is wrong. Like the whole reading Miranda rights. A cop actually told me they don't need to read your Miranda rights, unless they're going to interrogate you. That's what the Miranda rights are about. If they're just arresting you, you could talk or remain silent. I'm not doing nothing.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, you don't have the right for anything right there.

Dyalekt :

Inductive reasoning has been ruined by detective shows. All of the types of detective reasoning that you use, what was that Sherlock show that it recently was Cumberbatch where they got really detailed. And it sounds plausible, because writers are creative people. But remember, they also constructed the world so it's easy for them to create the things that bounce off it. They got to start at the end. Actual people who know deductive reasoning actually hate that show because it is not only doing it wrong, but it convinces people that the wrong way is the way to do it. And that's more harmful than just letting people not know it exists.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, it's so true. And I think, not to harp on, "It's a Wonderful Life" because it is one of my favorite movies. But even though the rich guy doesn't get what's coming to him in the end, the lesson in that movie is rely on your community and they will help you out.

Dyalekt :

I don't think that's hard thing. I think that's good, right? Yeah, that's a really nice message. Yeah, one that isn't very popular,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Right? Because also the narrative that we have in this country is the idea of the individual and the individualism and the ability to pull yourself up by your bootstraps, and you know, achieve the American dream on your own. One of the things that we were just talking about with our Preach to the Choir episode, last month, was the the concept and the building up of the white middle class was not that white people work really hard in the 50s and 60s. It's that the government subsidized creating white homeownership

Dyalekt :

obligatory thing that we have to say, because it's an obligation is that yes, there were white people who worked hard during the 50s and 60s. That's not what we're saying.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Thank you. Everyone works hard. But white people got this extra leg up from the government. And while that policy did exist, the narrative that sits above it, is that if you just work hard enough, then you'll be able to get yours too.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, you know, it's the kind of thing you know, I think a lot of people blame Disney and this is what they mean when they say that Disneyfication of our storytelling. Storytelling used to have a lot of different purposes. When we created stories, a lot of the fables were meant to make you worried and scare you so that you wouldn't do wild stuff. You know why Hansel and Gretel exists? You check it out now and you're like, Oh, these kids they go off and woods and the candy and get eaten, like what? But what's the point? Because it's telling you Don't take your behind out in the woods, just walking, wandering little kids. Stay around your parents, you're gonna have some witch find you and eat you.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

That is terrifying. You're right, that's a good lesson.

Dyalekt :

They were cautionary tales. Most of these children's stories are cautionary tales, because you know, there's a lot of rough stuff out there and try and make sure you don't get eaten by a wolf. But as things have been going as we become the top of the food chain, you know, this is similar to a lot of the anti backs type of stuff to where it's like, once we don't have any natural predators and everything is fine, you think that everything is gonna be fine. And that you don't have to worry about this. So then they take all of these old stories now that we're not literally worried about the coyote outside our door. They take these stories and then Disney in particular, but a lot of animation studios change the endings or change the path of the story, so that they weren't cautionary tales. So that they were celebrations of sometimes the deleterious actions that the main character was doing. Like Pinocchio runs like a madman and does all this terrible stuff but in the end he gets his.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Cuz he's the good guy right? And I think this this dichotomy of the good guy, bad guy thing and the bad guy always getting what's coming to them is something that Disney really, really just like injected into the culture

Dyalekt :

Well and then that became the only way you can see a film. If there's a film where that's not the point, then that is a weirdo indie film that might not get funded.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Or a horror movie. Right? Right.

Dyalekt :

But the horror movie is just the opposite. The horror movie is just like putting that on its head where it's now the villian is going to win and the hero's gonna, but also, most of the time in horror movies, some individual heroine who previously didn't have any of the skills required somehow topples the killing machine.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So, what does all this have to do with the racial wealth divide, right? What does this have to do with economic justice? And one of the theories and the thesis is that we have been exploring in the last couple years with Brunch and Budget, with this podcast, with a lot of the keynotes that we've been doing is that this idea of art and media and culture, really shaping how the racial wealth divide has come to be. And also that we need to bring art, culture and media back into the hands of the community, and recognize how powerful it is. I really believe that the reason why the society downplays the power of art and media is because they know that it's so powerful that it can create movements.

Dyalekt :

And a lot of that kind of came to a head in the 40s 50s and 60s, you know. As technology was increasing and making it easier to mass produce and send things out. People talked a lot about the word propaganda, and how there was art that was used as propaganda to prop up the war efforts. You know, there's that famous image of Captain America punching Hitler in the face. There was this idea that propaganda and art were kind of two separate things. Genesis of that began. And people started separating the idea that if your art is meant to create some social purpose, a sense of atleast some social good, then that art is propaganda, especially if it's something that we don't agree with. Or it doesn't adhere to our values, and then propaganda got this negative tone to it. And what's cool about that is that all of this art is the same thing as propaganda and propaganda is the same as all of this art. So if you can make something that is not seen as propaganda and is just seen as art, then that's the way that people will just decide that that's the way life is. You can hear that when you hear folks talk today about the gay agenda in Hollywood. I hear folks say all the time, hollywood got this gay agenda. And I'm like, What do you mean by the gay agenda? And they're like, well, when you watch shows, there's always like a gay person. Or like, a person with a gay romance or like a person saying gay stuff like the character might not be gay, but they'll like say some stuff that like, sideways, it's like it's like kind of gay. Which, okay, let's not even argue like that's not happening, right? I'm sure it's happening. Let's, let's accept that as truth, right? Like that's happening, right? There's gay folks who are saying I'm gay on screens and stuff and in stories, and that is propaganda to these folks because it is not the thing that aligns with their values. The thing that does align with their values are heterosexual things, and most pieces of art. Well, they'll say I was gonna say, most pieces of art. Like you know, you've got your ROM coms that are definitely often about a heterosexual relationship. You've got your action type of stories that are about the hero overcoming the bad guy, but also has heterosexual moments and a heterosexual thing. And why is that not a heterosexual agenda? Because being heterosexual is being straight as opposed to being crooked and is normal. It's the thing that is normal because it aligns with my values. Because the funny thing about that is it doesn't have to do with the majority because a lot of folks would be like, well, majority of people are heterosexual. So it's not that it doesn't align with my particular values. It's that it's what the majority is. But we were talking on that same preacher episode you reference about our deificatin of the rich, and they are not the majority also. So it's not about the majority is simply about it being the thing that I see myself as.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yes, absolutely. Well, and I think what's so powerful about art and media in general is that it not only creates a status quo, but it maintains the status quo. And so when you think about your own individual finances, and you look at how your money aligns with your values, I want you to just, as you listen to this episode, start to question some of the values that you may have developed based on external factors. There's a lot of people out there who want you to believe what they believe who wants you to fall into the status quo because the status quo benefits the wealthy elite. It benefits the people on top for one reason or another. So there is this narrative that they have crafted around this, that may or may not have shaped your values up to this point. And we just want to ask you to question it, just a little bit and see if these values that may have been affected by external forces, how they affect your finances in a negative way.

Dyalekt :

I'm going to ask you to do something that we probably should have done to let you know that we do do this live, you know, we haven't thought in the middle of recording. We, we may actually do this, if enough of y'all hit us up and ask us to do this. But what I would like you to do is think about the rhymes, the movie quotes, the literary quotes that you know, in your head, about money, and about responsibility. Take some of those and just unpack the heck out of it. Ask it all the questions and see if it really does make sense to you. The one that always comes to mind I always love is, like "might makes right" and stuff like that. You're like, Whoa, that immediately like sets it that doesn't work out to any sort of sense making thing.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

What about "an apple a day keeps the doctor away?"

Dyalekt :

Well, that's the worst one of them right?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

They're like we don't have health insurance. So I guess we'll just eat an apple

Dyalekt :

Apple's got sugar on them they're gonna get that sugar on your teeth you better go see somebody like you brushing your teeth too?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Well maybe we don't need universal health care then Dyalekt because we could just eat an apple.

Dyalekt :

Nam, you need vegetables too.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Alright, so let's go to a song and then let's start unpacking the heck out this.

Dyalekt :

Let's talk about food then. You know what, since we're talking about food, and I want to give y'all a little bit of a story that illustrates this type of thing. So fried chicken and watermelon. Black Americans, you guys already are feeling the kind of ways with me saying that I remember when my biracial behind was sitting at my Jewish families outdoor picnic type of event. My mom told me not to eat the fried chicken or watermelon in front of the Jewish side of my family. I didn't understand that. Well the real truth behind fried chicken and watermelon is after Africans were freed from chattel slavery, well, at least in name, one of the things that they had to do was figure out a way to eat and figure out way to feed their family and then maybe figure out a way to make some money. And chicken and watermelon are both things that can grow in small places under the worst conditions. So that fruit and that meat, those were the first two things that nearly free black Americans were able to make into industry. They were to take that to market and start selling. And then the minstrel shows the the newspaper cartoons the editorials all of the art of the day started portraying these as tools of the lazy. There was this concept of "chicken eating, chicken hearted". Yeah, the watermelon was not only a tool of the lazy but the imagery of it as a big smiling face was used to show how that black folks didn't have it so bad. And the chicken eating, chicken hearted stuff was about how black folks are cowards and black folks are lazy and black books are shiftless, and they did such a good job stamping out This form of commerce for black Americans that more than 100 years later, my mom is telling me not to eat chicken and watermelon in front of white folks. So now we're gonna go to a song called chicken and watermelon from products featuring jam poet. We'll check in a minute. Brunch and budget.

Unknown Speaker :

Just because you've been incarcerated and Arrested Development wouldn't be the pirate, tiny incisions in hip hop fabric located next to Beatrix and the head of the public in the lyrics and they love it. Ringling Brothers team of clowns harlem shake in southern star chop this group down and go and sample by this mean ghost writers shuffle in black males with a man who have for sale subjected to prose and perfected blackface minstrel shows. My finches don't no no samples, no stereotypes and my stereo the night Idon't care to keep up with the chicken eating chicken hearted you The exploitation of industry cones and close twisted spit in a destructive Cyclone hip hop is dead and will. guns are righteous is fun and misery friends enemies now one to infinity grudge and being so wrapped in a love couples don't have no more than is a fucked up Boolean isn't it so I can fully exist Mr. Sukkot And ain't nobody boys like I dedicate this to the farm where you discover to the hot seat I never been a shadow as opposed to my nuts with Autumn so when touch abrasive in rough luck is laughing in my face like she know I'm a thing design costs await the cream in the vein of my dream fuck a budget upon things takes a Chima to know not to innovate with me and McQueen Nicholas Thompson calls we love Jacob Bobby Hey Jacob was meant to be Chicken Chicken Chicken, whooping black bass black legs black middle finger plus an edit is edited to find a predicate never read the whole point, stay away with fat finger don't fuck me the gravel will try to learn some teach the kids how deep disease I saw just three she could drop have you on the journey with your body broken pieces. new rapids go faster. real music stop selling stock telling society they retired because consumer solve lies true fees feel real Don't waste your money your fire this hip hop be rocking the Kid Rock society's crowd jumps. Don't stop give a fuck if you like. I still speak for, the city the suburbs.

Dyalekt :

Chicken and watermelon.

Unknown Speaker :

They think that that's something wrong with me. You know take something you don't like chicken or watermelon. Something's wrong with you motherfucker. There's something wrong with you.

Dyalekt :

And we're back brunch and budget that was products featuring jam poet with chicken and watermelon. These cats is out here. Coming out of Atlanta, Georgia. We are talking about these kinds of things, not necessarily just about foods. But these kinds of stereotypes and the way that art has not only perpetuated things like stereotypes, but have perpetuated the racial wealth divide, and made it so that we can excuse and absolve folks of the actions that have caused harm to everybody.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, so we want to talk about four things today. In terms of the art and the culture that has perpetuated the racial divide. The first is art and media in general, and art and media going back to what Dyalekt was saying about the minstrel shows, all the way to today, when we look at social media, when we look at Instagram, when we look at Twitter, we look at Facebook, things like that. And then we also want to talk about selective historians and how history has been written in a way that really perpetuates economic injustice. And then we want to talk about dog whistle politics, and we'll go more into what the definition of dog whistle politics are. But they're these kind of insidious things that You say a phrase and it paints this picture in your head. And you don't realize that this is something that has just created an image that is negative for a lot of black and Latinx communities. And then the final thing we want to talk about is path to whiteness. And I feel like every non white race at some point was considered black. And now we are moving when you think about the Irish, right? And the indentured servant, do you think about the Jewish immigrants from the Holocaust? And then you think about right now I feel like what's happening is a lot of like Chinese Americans and light skinned Asian Americans in general, are moving towards that path to whiteness. And so what does that mean when we create this life path for people to get to the point where they're also considered, you know, part of the part of the status quo? So yeah, let's dive in. I know Dyalekt told that chicken and watermelon story, which I think is one of the earliest most pervasive things especially coming right out of slavery and taking away newly freed black Americans ability to actually create industry and to be entrepreneurs and to be business owners?

Dyalekt :

Yeah, probably not the first because during slavery, there was a lot of awful stuff to that I really don't have the heart and energy to get into. If you do feel free to go and dig into it, but please have some sort of thing to make you feel better ready.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah. So we'll start there. And then the next thing I think, let's find out the phrase Uncle Tom, because that was a book.

Dyalekt :

right? Uncle Tom's Cabin. Number one book in America, like wildfire spreading all across. And a popular, wonderful book that is great. It's about this slave named Uncle Tom. He went through all this stuff with his masters and in the end of the book, he's part of a group that is trying to escape that to flee, and he ends up being whipped to death, because he won't give up the location of these escaped slaves.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Wait, so I thought Uncle Tom was a bad thing though.

Dyalekt :

Well, the phrase Uncle Tom is a slur I think very popular in the 60s and 70s. Again, I only know that because of our media, I actually don't know if it It's still very popular in less recorded times. But anyway, where it's for black community talking about a person who's a sellout. And the reason for that is this very popular book. Well, it made folks nervous. So what they did is they took the topic of the day the in these minstrel shows, as Pam was talking about, which is theater. They would put on these plays, where they dressed everybody up like it was The Great Gatsby, and they had them speaking in. I know you're familiar with the "yessuh Massa" type of language, you know, type of stuff, and speaking like they were stupid, and the idea was too similar to the chicken and watermelon thing to make it simultaneously seem like black people were stupid and lazy. And also, they were doing really well and we shouldn't worry about them. Which is hilarious in that it's still what people like to say about black people today. I saw this right wing thing where they were talking about how with the democratics you know, primary is going on everyone talking about the racial wealth divide. There was this cat talking about Well, the problem is all these democrats saying that they're gonna help black people because they don't need to coddle or baby black people, black people are doing just fine.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Wow. And what's interesting too about these these minstrel shows and this idea of kind of showing that like, oh, black people don't need help, they're doing just fine. Or that you know, and they're stupid and

Dyalekt :

Because what's great about it is the idea that's presented in your head is, in general, black people are doing just fine. And when you see one that isn't, it's because of their stupid laziness.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

And we reference an Instagram post in some of our workshops, where there is a very, difficult stat to swallow with the racial divide, right? When we talk about the average net worth of single women and black and Hispanic women's average net worth is around one to $200 and a white single woman's average net worth is between $30 to $40,000. And one thing I realized, I just made the connection literally now after talking about this is her interpretation of this is I'm quoting this verbatim "studies say the average black woman looks good from head to toe and very flattering but only worth $10 or less because they live above their means." It's the exact same story these mental shows have been telling us for hundreds of years.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, it's it's been something that's been built on top of itself.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, absolutely. And it's still Instagram today, this post was from 2019. There's still this idea that black people are doing just fine. And if they just saved a little bit more money, if they were just smarter with it. If they worked harder, then maybe we wouldn't have a racial wealth divide. Yes. So the next thing is, so we talked about Uncle Tom's Cabin. I want to talk about language now and how powerful languages because language is a big part of art and media. And we we've all heard of black Wall Street, or maybe most of us have heard of black Wall Street, if not definitely Google it.

Dyalekt :

Well, the Tulsa massacre as it's also known as he, was popular, it's in the new watchmen show so it's getting a little bit more. You know, we if y'all listen to the Tulsa real estate fund, we talked a little bit about that then.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah. And basically what happened was there was a row of black businesses in Tulsa that got burned down by white townspeople.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, they basically came in firebomb the place yeah.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

They firebombed the place and they threatened to do it again. If Black businesses rebuilt themselves according to locals, they still threatened. Yeah. And so we we have an old newspaper clipping from the time and the headline is 85 whites and negros die in Tulsa riots as 3000 armed men battle in streets. 30 blocks burn. Military rule in city. So this was a huge huge they call it a riot. It was definitely a massacre. Especially based on you know how the the the kind of air in the city today but the word that we want to focus on is the word Riot

Dyalekt :

Riot not only socially makes it seem like you know, one Riot is often ascribed to black people. People always talk about how black people ride and they destroy their own property destroy their own community.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, but the thing about the word Riot is when you get an insurance policy, there are these things called exclusions, and an insurance policies required to pad a claim, unless there is an excluded event. So often there's excluded events like terrorism is an excluded event, for instance. So if there's an act of terrorism, if there's like a flood, sometimes that's an excluded event unless you have like a flood rider. I know a lot of renter's insurance policies, if there's water damage, that's an exclusion unless you have a specific rider for it.

Dyalekt :

Well, and in all of these black communities, every place that had insurance had an exclusion for riot.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

If your building was burned down or if there was damage caused because of a riot, then your insurance policy would deny your claim.

Dyalekt :

It's acts of godlike in that the idea behind it is still, we expect you people to riot because you tend to do that to yourselves. So if that kind of stuff happens, we're not cleaning up after your mess.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, it's not our fault, but you got into this situation. And so basically not only were these black business owners threatened by the townspeople to not rebuild their businesses, but even if they wanted to do so these insurance policies that they paid money for, because it was literally in the paper that it was classified as a riot, these insurance policies were not required to pay any claims to these black business owners so they could not even financially rebuild the businesses that were burned down. And so that is how language impacts us economically in ways that I feel like are so insidious that we don't even realize

Dyalekt :

yet you know, another one that is happens today to give you know, the parallel because we always like to talk about the unbroken line that these things aren't stuff that just happened as we're talking about. They build on each other and they continue to grow, and what you can see today very easily in newspapers when they want you to be afraid of a suspect, they will use the present tense to make it seem like they're looming there at large. And when you're not supposed to be afraid of someone, I'm just guessing, but you could probably see that with the Weinstein case. They use the past tense. It's very simple. Very subtle.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, not he's at large.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, language is extremely, extremely powerful. Well, I mean, that's the whole point of it is that we're using the tools that we have to create images in people's heads that don't necessarily match up with the actual thing. Yes.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

And speaking of language, being powerful, let's talk about dog whistle politics. Okay.

Dyalekt :

So dog whistle politics so like, what that means is the dog whistle thing is you know, only dogs can hear the dog whistle.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So react to it. Yeah. And then

Dyalekt :

when they react with the dogs can hear it, we can't hear it. So why what people mean when they're talking about dogs whistle politics is they're saying something politically that is spousing something that may be a radical idea, but under the cover of it being something innocuous and small that everyone does every day. A really easy example is the okay white supremacy symbol that was like, it was a 4chan joke where these guys were like, we're gonna put up this W and it means white supremacy but it really looks like a okay symbol. So it's plausible deniability and like, what, no, I'm just saying everything's okay. No, you're the one with the problem.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Right? Right. Well, and it's usually dog whistle politics are usually things that people can get behind in terms of like, the one of the examples is the war on drugs, right? Drugs are bad. Like, we need to

Dyalekt :

The whole concept of drugs. Yeah, of like, the way that drugs were branded. I mean, Yo, y'all. In "It's a Wonderful Life" when they filmed it's wonderful life. I bet when you walk by the pharmacy you can see that they're selling heroin over the counter clearly.

Unknown Speaker :

You don't know this movie as well as I do, right because the opening scene is basically the main character Jimmy Stewart's character character gets his ears knocked out by the pharmacists, because the pharmacist was preparing some kind of like opiate type drug and accidentally prepared a poison instead.

Dyalekt :

Well no i did remember them.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So it's in there. As recently as the 40s drugs that are illegal now and drugs that are actually being you know, ravaging you know, white communities, right with the opiates and things like that. Were around. And so when we talk about the war on drugs, the aid for Nixon's war on drugs recently came out in 2016 and admitted that the war on drugs specifically targeted black people in hippies

Dyalekt :

Yeah, just straight up said that by name. I love How they could just say that after they retired, they're like, I want to clear my conscious. Yeah, we're here to destroy a whole group of people. And we did it.

Unknown Speaker :

Yeah, we did it for two years later, and they use the phrase war on drugs because it sounded scary. It sounded like something you would get behind. Oh, drugs are bad. They're ruining communities. They're destroying lives. They're killing people. Of course, we should eradicate drugs from the community.

Dyalekt :

What do you think of when you hear the word hippie? For the most part, most people they'll say, lazy, doing drugs. Anarchist. Radical. Free love. Smelly. Dirty. Yep, something that's dangerous. Something that's unlikable. There's a "eww hippie," and that's where that came from. And they're telling us later that they just did all of that, so that they could make sure that they had these people under the thumb because what's real about hippies is that hippies were activists. Hippies were revolutionaries. Hippies weren't lazy at all hippie were getting things done. And that was some They had a problem with

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

And end the Vietnam

Dyalekt :

War. They were people who are multiracial who align themselves with black power, who align themselves with women's rights. They created this coalition of folks that we see today when we're talking about marginalized people who work together or should work together.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Well. And what's interesting too, is also when I hear the word hippie, I think of a white person. Yeah. So it's specifically like, Oh, these like, smelly people who are not part of the culture who are trying to counter the culture and all of that stuff. And I think it's just really interesting that you hear this phrase, and you hear the word and how quickly like a stereotype condors, right,

Dyalekt :

yeah, so the thing with that that reminds me of for today is then we also have like we had the hippies. Right. And nowadays we have the hipsters. Mm hmm. And that's anybody who wants to do something counterculture, right. Someone wants you to do something counterculture, and not only the hipsters, but then we also that it kind of bled into the social justice warriors where everyone ascribes this rich white ideal on to the both the hipster and the social justice warrior. And the statement is that all of those ideals that you may agree with that they are fighting for, they don't really believe in them because they don't need them. They're really just rich white people who are out there having fun.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah. And I think today we can see the analog for this narrative. When we look at what people are calling the opiate epidemic and white communities that I referenced, right? Why isn't there a war on drugs now? It's the it really when we look at the war on drugs, it was really the genesis of mass incarceration.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, and a point that I was making that was like, not exactly aligned with that. I just want to be clear. What I was saying about the the hipsters and the social justice warriors and the hippies and their alignment with all of that it's that they were being shown to be bad because they were looking out for marginalized people. Yes, and thus they were since they were like, Oh, we can't necessarily take a multiracial coalition of people and make that a stereotype. We'll just say, well, there's a lot of white people in these white people that are part of it. They are shameful for being a part of that because they're fake. It's also where crappy stuff like the word wigger comes from. And yo, hey, white people, you know, if you say the N word in front of me, you probably gonna get punched in the face. If you say wigger in front of me, you will also get punched in the face because that's just a contraction. Yeah, so just fair warning.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

The same thing. So now let's talk about the phrase welfare queen. It was coined in the 80s by Ronald Reagan. I just want you to stop and think about what image comes up in your head when you hear the phrase welfare queen. Who is she? Who is this welfare queen, Queen England? I'm gonna say some real stuff that's gonna open up a bunch of can of worms that we're not going to talk about, but please discuss amongst yourselves and holler back at us if you feel like you need to unpack more welfare queen looks like Lizzo.

Dyalekt :

Like her outfit and everything.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Well, so is Lizzo breaking down the stereotypes? I love Lizzo.

Dyalekt :

I should say that I'm a big fan of Lizzo and I don't think Lizzo is perpetuating the welfare queen type of thing. I don't know her or her work well enough to know if she's intentionally being like, I have the look of the welfare queen. So I'm gonna you know, do something about that. But definitely her work is countered to that.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah. Wow.

Dyalekt :

But I say that because there's like a prominent black woman right now who is celebrated because she's talented and because he's really honest with her stuff. And people do have the same type of vitriol they had for the mythical welfare queen of the 80s

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

They really do oh my gosh, outfits that she wears that a skinnier person would wear thinner person would wear she gets so much hate for it.

Dyalekt :

You know you gotta love it. It was something about her wearing a thong at a public event and people were mad. And it was the same year that JLo rewar sexy, skimpy, but display and dress that she'd worn several years ago. And everybody was all about it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, everyone was celebrating that that was fine right? Well I'm what's interesting too about

Dyalekt :

Before we get into that can we like tie some stuff together? That's so yeah. Cuz we're thinking about the Lizzo thing and how it's not celebrated and all that kind of stuff and the welfare queen, right. So and then talking about the black imagery that we've been doing for years the idea that black people are lazy. Also things that have been tied to it people who are overweight have a lot of fat on them. Yeah, also been described as lazy.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I was gonna say the Jillian Michaels thing. She was like, "why are we celebrating diabetes?" I wish we could just make it about the music and not celebrate the diabetes that I'm sure she's gonna get.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, yeah, I kind of hope Lizzo makes a song about diabetes.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Meanwhile, Lizzo is like running around on stage two hours a day while playing the flute singing live and dancing with her ballerinas.

Dyalekt :

Well and if she does die from some sort of medical condition, good cuz she's a person and that's what's gonna happen to most of us.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, exactly. And so this idea of the welfare queen, still even from the 80s we have this comic where it was referenced during Obama's campaign in 2008 2012.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, well I mean the welfare queen continues to be a thing even though I will never stop saying the only welfare queen I know of lives in England. Yeah, for real props to the people who got out.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

yeah. Props to the people who got out was that was that you know, Was that it? Was that get out part two? Thank you, Megan.

Dyalekt :

I don't really have any aspirations to interview someone as famous as Megan Markel. But if I ever were to, I want to ask her how many times she heard exact statements from "get out" fromt he Royal Family.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, my God, too much, too much. So we have dog whistle politics and they're everywhere. We just got to look for them I feel like.

Dyalekt :

More important than looking for them. Listen to the affected people when they say it's real, because I think that's one of the things with stuff like microaggressions. and stuff like that is a lot of folks like to be like, it doesn't affect me. I don't I'm not familiar with it. It's not around me. So it's not so bad. And you should stop stressing about it. Yes. Just listen to folks when they say that they're the affected group. And the thing is affecting them.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah. Well, and I'm glad that you said that because the microaggressions thing actually affects people's finances. it straight up affects people's economic situation. When you're at a job and you feel like that someone says or does something to make you feel uncomfortable, but it's not. It's not big enough, right? It's not obvious enough that you can say anything. It's just these little cuts, chipping away at you and eventually, you might have to quit that job. You may have to, you know, do more self care more often you might not be able to concentrate on saving it might be causing you an amount of stress That doesn't allow you to actually feel financially stable. And so these kinds of insidious things dog whistle politics was like, you know, I feel like the institutionalization of microaggressions. Right?

Dyalekt :

Well, I mean, I'll put it like this when it comes to the microaggressions thing, because I don't want to get into there's a lot of counter arguments folks will make to this kind of thing. And I'm gonna put it like this. If your server at a restaurant is slightly, not super enthusiastic about everything, a lot of folks will give them a nickel or less as a tip.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, for real. So

Dyalekt :

it's okay for people to say and do things that say, people who chip away at the thing that makes me me don't get to be around me. Yeah, that's a good thing. Yeah. And we're not going to get into like how heavy it is, or if you can take it or too much and all that kind of stuff, because that's a whole nother argument and a whole nother conversation that have nothing to do with none.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

But yeah, it's okay for you to step away from that situation. So now let's talk about the path to whiteness.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, cuz that's a weird phrase. The path to whiteness. Like what is what is that? Is that like skin bleaching? is there is there like lightning? So is there like a it's like a Stephen King story where like you just like walk down this road and get paler.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I can write a horror movie Oh my god. Well, okay. I mean, we've talked about the concept of black and white people being very much an economic decision in America. And we talked about Bacon's Rebellion. And this idea of needing to create a separation between poor black people and poor white people. So they would fight amongst themselves instead of trying to take down the slave masters, right. And so that was the crux of Bacon's Rebellion. And all of that leads to I feel like this concept of the path to whiteness, where slowly but surely, different races who were once considered black or second class is kind of the is kind of the correlation that people are making is they got the opportunity To be considered white, right? And so I feel like so many people make the argument about the Irish were slaves to you hear that all the time, right? The Irish were slaves to the Irish actually true, not actually true at all. They were indentured servants who could eventually gain their freedom. But this idea that Irish Americans at one point in the United States were considered black, right? And then eventually, they were able to gain the status of being considered white. And now people who are of Irish descent, are considered white people in America. They're treated like white people in America.

Dyalekt :

By the way, American history buffs are doing a lot of history paraphrasing for folks again about like stuff that are other longer conversations.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yes, yes. This is the cliff notes version from someone who is not a history buff, but

Dyalekt :

he'll tell you spark notes are even out.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I know, I'm super old. What is it now Wikipedia,

Dyalekt :

Notes.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Just your Notes app. So then we look at Chinese Americans when they were railroad workers, right. And Chinese Americans we talked last time about how they were considered a threat. Because they were taking away jobs from other Americans and so they created the Chinese Exclusion Act and they created the Immigration Act of I don't remember what year to be honest.

Dyalekt :

By the way, I think I want to take that nomenclature using because saying considered a threat rather than considered black because today we have so many things that we think and feel when we say stuff like considered black about like language and what dancing is.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Is that another dog whistly thing too?

Dyalekt :

Kind of but like again, a whole nother episode? Yeah. But like, I like that you saying considered a threat? Because that's kind of the real point.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Right. Exactly. So they were considered a threat. And I mean, but they were considered black right. Back in the early 1900's.

Dyalekt :

Yes. But not with the standard that we have now.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yes. I got you. Yes, exactly. And so language, right, so powerful. And so as time went on, we look at the 40s and we look at World War Two, and Japanese Americans because they were allied with the Axis powers. They were allied with Germany and they were sent to internment camps. Chinese people actually wore buttons to say I am Chinese so that people knew that they were not Japanese. And they should not be considered a threat.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, I mean, that was the era of literally, we talked about it today in metaphor, but literally wearing your politics on your sleeve. Yes, totally. Right. Jews had it tattooed to their sleeve. Yeah. And then Chinese people had like these big buttons. I just thought those things simultaneously happening was like, also very fascinating. Yeah. Especially the way that we talk about, like, people talking about identity politics now. Like it's brand new.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Right? Absolutely. I mean, and then let's talk about, you know, Jewish people, right. When we're talking about the Holocaust, and we're talking about World War Two.

Dyalekt :

I remember, you know, growing up black and Jewish, I've always looked at and been told about the parallels between black Americans and Jewish folks how they work together to build the NAACP. Now I'm forgetting the date, but there was a time In Europe, where the Eastern European Jews were literally referred to as the black people. There often is a lot of talk about the, the ways that they came up similarly, and we talked about Asians as model minorities, but Jews are often also spoken of as model minorities. Because they were pretty public enemy number one, even at the beginning of World War Two, there were a lot of people who didn't well, America didn't want Jews.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

They didn't they didn't they were not allowing Jewish refugees who are fleeing from Germany to come into this country.

Dyalekt :

The Syrian thing, right? Like recently, we were like, Oh, we don't want all these Syrians it's gonna be problems and all that it was the exact same thing except worse. Look up some of the headlines.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, that was as as recent as the 40s as recent as World War Two Jewish immigrants who are trying to come to this country as refugees were not being let in right. And so then again, we continue on this path to whiteness.

Dyalekt :

Can I give you the path to whiteness for Jews? Really, really super real. The path to whiteness for Jews. And what's funny is you can really see that in the way that white people who didn't want them to get white have always been mad about it. The stereotype of Jews running the entertainment industry.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yes,

Dyalekt :

And that comes from Jews. And this is funny because this is very similar to the Gay Agenda thing I just talked about, that comes from Jews getting in the entertainment industry and some powerful Jews. Well, some Jews creating large works that made them and their image powerful, which made it seem to folks that Jews were the ones doing everything. I mean, you know, Superman was created as an immigrant story by a couple of Jews. Yeah, Schuster and Seagull. And so many of our storytellers of the 1900s I mean, like all of the 1900s. Because you can go back as far as Simon and Schuster, and you can come up as recent as Steven Spielberg see that a number of Jewish people have worked really hard at making sure that people understood that Jews had terrible things done to them. And were a noble people, you know, the, the Eisner Award winning comic mouse that depicts things. I also think about when I was a kid, and I definitely watched an American tale 80 million times. And I still have it on VHS. And there are so many pieces of art. Like I probably couldn't name them all in this episode, or having its own episode about Jewish people being treated badly and overcoming obstacles because they're hard working kind people. Yes. And that really happened, right? As World War Two is happening, because public sentiment was anti Jewish. And then as we got into the war, and we're fighting the Germans, we needed to create a new reason why it was okay for us to be over there. And then we had to have the Jews as the people we wanted to save. Yeah, by the way as a person of Jewish decent I feel the need to remind you that Jews were only half of the people who are killed in the Holocaust. Romanies, homosexuals, Africans, people of many other cultures were also slaughtered and don't get enough light.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yes, agreed. So then this does lead into the model minority myth and this concept that was created. Really what it is, and I feel like it's used as a phrase for Asian Americans in particular today, but this idea of, hey, this group was marginalized, and they just work really hard and they were successful. So why can't you guys figure it out, and that again, creates this additional division between people of color, so that, you know, some people of color could see that, hey, maybe one day I'll be considered white, I'll be considered successful. I will have worked hard enough so that I could find the same success in this country.

Dyalekt :

And even if they don't, there's a thing about stratification where you create this hierarchy and you make it normal. Yeah, you know, you build a world and this is a storytelling One on one thing. You build the world and you create the norms, and the thing that's important for it is that everyone isn't meant to leave their station. So while some folks will be like, yeah, I can go and move to another thing if I want to other people just need the comfort of understanding that there is a structure and they are meant to be in this place.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Absolutely. And I mean, I think the thing that we see today when it comes to the, the height of the model minority, I guess, what am I trying to say? Like,

Dyalekt :

what is the height?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

The height of this, this concept of the model minority, or the arrogance of the model minority? I think is what I'm trying to say is I don't know if you all saw that there was a Chinese father who was encouraged to sue Harvard by a white guy because the father's child did not get into Harvard. And he decided to blame affirmative action as the reason why his kid didn't get into Harvard.

Dyalekt :

Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait the NAS song? What's the NAS song primitive action with Foxy Brown like that's Anybody can get in. I think that's going to far.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I wish I knew what that song was. So you know, the concept of affirmative action where they did want to make sure that the student body of colleges were diverse. And so they started asking what races people were to make sure that they were admitting as many people of color or more people of color than normally would have if they weren't asking for that. And so affirmative action, has actually, in the last several decades benefited white people, white women, and Asian Americans the most. And so this, this Chinese father, who's trying to sue Harvard has probably benefited from affirmative action himself and a lot of other Asian American families have benefited from affirmative action. And so now what's happening is he's like, well, I got to this point, and now I want my son to be able to get this point and it's not fair and let's get rid of affirmative action. When it's the thing that got him to the place that he's in now. And one thing I think is really interesting. Again, when it comes to the this concept of the model minority is we start to look within our communities of color as the problem. And not the fact that the white supremacist structure is the reason why his son didn't get into Harvard. You know who took your spot, you know who took that sons spot is all the legacy students whose white parents got into Harvard previously, and they just got in because their parents were in before.

Dyalekt :

Can I talk a thing about art and affirmative action? Yes, so I like a lot of indie art. I like a lot of indie everything, you know, from the songs that we play here on the show, you know. We dig to find indie artists, you know, and they're like some of these guys this is like the only project I've even made. What I love about indie art is that it's challenging rather than comforting. And I think of a pair of films from the civil rights era Malays explosion of a dream differed time period. Where some folks got real with their art and it scared folks into action. One is A Spook who sat by the door and the other is Putney Swope. Both are stories of affirmative action. These are black writers and black directors who are creating these stories. And A Spook who sat by the doorfirst black CIA agent who because of affirmative action. And then he becomes a CIA agent. Is a model agent for five years, retires, goes back to the hood in Chicago and teaches all of the gang members CIA tactics and black people take over the country in violent revolution. This was a very popular film until it was shut down and kind of like censored I guess. Yeah, basically censored in that when I heard about this film in the 90s, it took me 10 years to even find a dusty dirty DVD copy, because most of them had been destroyed and it had been taken out of theaters. The other film is Putney Swope, which is a little more surrealist type of film but one about a black guy who through a form of action was put on the board of a major company. When it was time to vote for a new president, everybody voted for the black guy because they didn't want to vote for each other and they were hoping that that would make them win. So then that black guy became the CEO and then started doing a bunch of revolutionary stuff with the company and taking over scared folks. This is the thing about challenging art. A lot of comforting art people don't dig because it doesn't help people right? It makes you feel good in the moment but it doesn't move the needle it doesn't make change. And we look at a lot of like the more aggressive more challenging art we like we love it because of its ability to make change. And these films are, along with a lot of other art are ones that actually were making enough change similar to the Uncle Tom's Cabin that it scared people into doing the thing that often are quote unquote free speech advocates are all you know really anti is they shut these pieces of art down.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh my god, can we go to a song because I think you just messed me up.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, you don't even know about that, huh? I'm gonna go to actually a really dope song. Yeah, this one is about the subject but it's a little bit different from where we're at. And I appreciate it and the style is also really interesting. This is an artist named Uncle Tom and Associates and a song called Foolery. We'll be back in a minute, brunch and budget.

Song :

Lay my head down bloody knuckles body beating heart is being pretty hard now fall apart to find a part to play or be put in one and let my guard down hard to follow harder smaller funnel faces when I bring that it's just a job clinching up upon it looks impressive niggas on Avenue Magnum rapper open she's gonna wrap this up Am I really doing this again? For the encoder take it someone mama when I feel shame really listen and I got so many scars upon my skin from kiss and knives and cooking in the Michelin vessel fodder pieces think I reached my limit any minute on my load percentage on 100 days a number Dr. Phil it motherfucking bones and they get set at home I'm alone step around all these phone negative I'm sorry if I did not hit you back it really just means that I cannot sell which shoes hold onto your choosing some suited and cannot be bothered to news as a nuisance of problems selling on oceans of issues metalia rally around me but I'm too weak so to keep all of my leg is held down see if it's out the water where the fuck am I supposed to go now sunken ship within the sea I feel as though I should have drowned like David in their fucking swimming pool intelligently artificial ignored until it gets physical. I'm not like history Madigan see me on top of the peak gather up your army sense of defeat. They're coming from me I needed to breathe the coldest winter squirted by the side of people with their vegan energies become the leader face execution in the face of your greatest enemies. pestilent presence observer no pressure applied in the face of deliverance. No, we're not what they do so forgive them in the face of their ignorance and my final breath acid This is what it means to be a person as if this is what it means to be a rapper wars is just what it means to be me. never meant to be mean. My body is broken from life's little token handed out to gratitude mountain climbing while you should target what you cannot weather this out to align us with the pain and the stuff going on and I'm waiting for death never conceived from the pain that I get painted pictures of the greener pastures with a blood on my hand Don't fuck with the plans that gets ready fingertips wanted something from me something to see something for them someone they want me to be off his head this indecision with a single step in and double standards has me looking insane a man of honor I was brought up to being It feels like a game and you can't like you can't stop stuck with his name in the middle of mine fucking with me. And every time I'm looking down at puddles there's a bastard looking up at me. Nothing to see out of the moment. I look like a ghost like everyone knows that I noticed the bones isn't close to my closet. I'm running from nothing checks to deposit I pay my opponents and so the day I exit out like JC or The Truman Show, thank me at the funeral. Men have been buried my mannequins, Madden and nig I am who I am for he is I and I am him a passenger upon the ship searching for the Atlanta sea and solitude upon a cliff of horrible Atlanta. What was the plan master of death taking the stance bringing The Doom like metal my hands bringing the strings Japan Oh my man's afraid your friends your Portuguese friends playing Purple Rain back in school because you I really want me to go and play a nigga for falsetto for some fuzzy trying to trap a nigga with a kid like it's fucking cool and I'm dead inside because it using me and I set aside just for you to see when I fucking die that's my eulogy and I stand on top of podium screaming carpet dance and he's fucking demons doing dirty Tony's niggas going clean and solar beaming on a sunny day tomfoolery tomfoolery.

Dyalekt :

And we're back brunch and budget. That was Uncle Tom and Associates from New York they didn't specify whether state or city with their joint Foolery. I love you talking about words and wordplay again, right Uncle Tom plus also Tom Foolery, and clearly this artist understands not only the real story of Uncle Tom but also the public image of Uncle Tom and his sarcastically using that name and that vibe.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Awesome. Challenging art again.

Dyalekt :

Challenging art which is tough you know, cuz like my bad Uncle Tom and Associates if heads are like fronting on this type of thing, because a lot of people will look at surface elements and then determine whether or not they think that's for them or think that's a positive thing. And there are plenty of people who will look at a name and say Uncle Tom and Associates owe you a sellout.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Right? Exactly.

Dyalekt :

Did you give it a try? Yeah. And I think that is the ill and pervasive and really genius thing about a lot of this harmful pop art. Is that it just by virtue of its existence as a standard, it makes it so that challenging art is then demonized, and something that people further don't want to deal with.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

What the heck do we do with all of this? Right? And I think I said at the beginning of the episode, but we just now went through all of it. And it's not even all of it. We I feel like we just hit the tip of the iceberg, right? I know that when I started learning about this stuff and Dyalekt has taught me a lot of the stuff to be honest with all of the art and media that surrounds this racial wealth divide is it's everywhere. When you start to see it somewhere, you start to see it everywhere. And we hope that by listening to this episode, you start to question where the art and media that you're consuming is really coming from and what status quo they're trying to perpetuate, and what insidious things they may or may not be trying to do to get you to just stay where you are In the movie Terminator, the robot automation from the future is here to destroy us. But by the 90s that same robot automation from the future is going to save us. Wow. Yeah, it's five years. It's everywhere. I could,

Dyalekt :

like I have so many examples, I could pull out my book.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So when it comes to just examine your own personal finances, and I think, you know, our theme for this year, if we have any such thing as that our theme for our life is that personal finance is a revolutionary act. And when you can start to think of your finances as a way to empower you, and also empower others around you in your community. And you can start to see that having a savings account and aligning your spending with your values. Questioning these systems, and really trying to understand how to design new systems if you can. If you have that ability is something that can really lift us all up.

Dyalekt :

I'm sorry, I know that challenging systems is hard. It's hard and feels impossible. One thing that we will tell you about things like challenging systems, please can you look at it the same way we tell you to track your expenses. Do it one at a time. A lot of us want to see a better world. And a lot of us want to be a part of that and change the world for the better. And I think one way that we end up burning ourselves out is we try to do all of it at once. Yeah. And it's like, Yo, I want to start recycling, right. And recycling is a good thing. But oh, we're using so much water to rinse off the things of recycling. So now I got to fix the water and the recycling. Oh, but the recycling industry isn't equitable for the community's interest is getting dropped off like this. Everything has a can of worms in it. And the thing of it is, is it's true. All of its true. And it's all real, and it's all terrible. And yes, we do want it to be better. You're not Not going to make it better by trying to jump on the pilot once. At best, it's gonna wear you out and you're not gonna want to do it anymore. Find the thing that you can do find the place where you can find comfort in discomfort, and then make that happen. And then keep pushing. Because what Pam was saying, that is your responsibility. Your responsibility to get more fun about words is your ability to respond. What can you do? You know, I'm preaching to the choir we are at the end of each episode, we often ask like, at least you can do the most you can do. But it's about finding that place where you can create a space where you are uncomfortable, where you are challenged, where you are doing things when people are talking about fitness, and they talk about how creating a muscle is tearing it in order to fill it and then make it new and how pain is weakness leaving the body and all that kind of stuff. Same metaphors for your comfortability, with the status quo and the world around you. Otherwise we're going to keep running in place. Running in place is the title of a song that I played on a previous brunch and budget by this artist who used to go by the name Finite, but now has changed his name to Vigil and vigil is asking back to the same record from the album response, ability to words who will remember if you don't.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

If you do like the show, and you listen to it, please rate us on Apple podcasts. It helps other people find the show and we spread the message. Yeah.

Dyalekt :

And if you have particular thoughts that you want to say and share about that we're open here and all that stuff. We really want to hear from you. And we love when we have these conversations and this discourse about racial wealth divide. I know it's tough, but remember, like the other podcasts we have, you don't know much you can know that one thing we preach to the choir, so we know what to say. Right? That's all the thing that we're doing here. So build, share, make stuff together. We're gonna lead you out with who will from vigil and we'll check you next time. Got a York Pennsylvania By the way, bunch of budget recent wealth network peace.

Song :

I carry weight out ball dropping so my shoulders fold pushed it to the edge can't stop until this whole no rolls off. We all fall and if we were told that stone shaping over identities and picking every goal we hold, I thought that we control the balls but I was wrong. Don't tip from a distance. Listen to the sovereign song I thought that I could simply ride along feet in arms buckled muscles struggling to be at large. All we wanted was to see the stars that were breathing are trying to catch a glimpse of anything between the bars leaving sores we don't recognize spread lies toxic as insecticide innocence is jeopardized underwater in the found basically drowning out the sounds of the muffle heavens cries, desensitized smartphone reject the wise testifies to the fact we're running out a second tries to show them how to fight well, if I don't focus on the light. Well, if I don't know without, well, well, we'll show him how to fight. If you don't focus on the light. If you don't know without citing who willbe jealous of the fellas only for the fun of it is answering God's calling like asking him for punishment. serpent works plenty taxes like the government, not the words it takes a lot of wax to keep the dungeon lid punching down We're still on double split a living breathing paradox alone to float aboard a sunken ship. Buckets filling buckets tip is not just level head stuck between the usual entertainment and special ed. Making my mark darker than pencil inspired by the factor of rebel blends that in himself he said the devil's branch ostracize murder the least that I can do was never compromise the message or mechanics in the music got make money so seductive temptation few can escape only so much that a human can take but smart decisions seem to follow easy after stupid mistakes. Show them how to fight. Well. Focus on the light. Well, if I don't know without sight, well, well, tell me who will show him how to fight. Well, if you don't focus on the light. Well, if you don't know without sight and who will will tell me who will focus on the writing If I will show him how to fight if I don't focus on the light if I don't know without that, well if you don't show him how to fight well, if you don't focus on the light and well, if you don't know without sight and who will then who will tell me who will