Brunch & Budget

b&b227: Put your money where your mouth is - dismantling systemic racism with your dollars

June 11, 2020 Brunch & Budget
Brunch & Budget
b&b227: Put your money where your mouth is - dismantling systemic racism with your dollars
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Brunch & Budget
b&b227: Put your money where your mouth is - dismantling systemic racism with your dollars
Jun 11, 2020
Brunch & Budget

Put your money where your mouth is!   In this episode we talk about dismantling systemic racism with your dollars, ways to support POC businesses and also some great recommendations on POC businesses.

Show Notes Transcript

Put your money where your mouth is!   In this episode we talk about dismantling systemic racism with your dollars, ways to support POC businesses and also some great recommendations on POC businesses.

Dyalekt :

Just like hot box and hot chocolate, being on the block is too hot for Jake's hot takes man. Justice, we served it up on a hot plate ya'll. This is a brunch and budget. The show about personal finance and racial economic inclusion with your host Pamela Capaled, a Certified Financial Planner and Accredited Financial Counselor. Here to take the bite out of your budget. I'm your sound provider, Dyalekt. Brunch & budget is part of the Race and Wealth Network. Here is your host, Pamela Capalad.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Thank you, Dyalekt and thank you all for tuning in. All right, everybody. Welcome.

Dyalekt :

Welcome everybody to the spot.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, so it's been quite a week. It's been a week Yes, we are interrupting our regularly scheduled programming to talk about where finance fits into all of this. Where does finance fit into the black lives matter movement into the protests. How can you put your money where your mouth is? If you're not able to go out there and protest which is a lot of us. I mean, us included, we have an eight month old right here. What can you do right now? What can you do from home? What can you do with your dollars? How can you start dismantling systemic racism with your dollars? Yeah, and on a personal tip just because we'll share because you know, feel free to share things that you feel like we're supposed to be on vacation this week. It's our anniversary and everything. I got the messy bun going.

Dyalekt :

We haven't done that in a while. So we were like, let's do that. Also, I'm wearing a silly hat because ain't going out in the while, nothing fun like that. So the boys clawing at my hat, so I figured I'd just wear it. I don't know how long we're gonna be doing these lives or like how long it's necessary. But I figured I'll just wear these these fun hats here with y'all because you know, I love it. I love it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, and our baby is doing his thing. But today, we really want to talk about how to put your money where your mouth is. I think that there's a big aspect of systemic racism that comes from consumerism that comes from the racial wealth divide and really understanding what your values are is really important.

Dyalekt :

Capitalism in the way that it currently functions which is an extension of systemic racism. Where it's like hand in hand. I'm not sure exactly how you call it. But I mean, it needs racism to exist for them to do their thing. It needs to be able to disinclude people. It needs to create minority scapegoats, minority exceptionalist, and all sorts of things that make sure that we don't move the needle.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So we did want to start today with doing a recap on what's still available to you talking about the unemployment assistance that's still available, talking about the PPP loans that are still available, because that's a huge part is really understanding how you can supplement your income in this time. There are 40 million people who apply for unemployment since the pandemic started. So unemployment still a very huge issue going on right now. And I think it's important to know especially if you're a freelancer, or if you've lost your job, and you're not sure what your job prospects are, really how to how to navigate this time and still be able to take care of yourself and also be sure if you want to go out and march and protest to be able to also physically be healthy to do it. Yeah. And really well, a lot of folks are like, well, let's burn down this, let's burn down that and let's take down the system. That doesn't mean that we should let go of all of our loot and all of our plans for our money right now. Because the system hasn't come down yet. And we don't know what it's gonna look like when we're going to be finished with it. So right now it's time to hold on to the things that you have and spend money on what's important. Yes, yes, he's eight months old. He's getting big. He's currently unemployed as well. So if you lost your job as an employee, unemployment assistance is still expanded. You are able to get an extra $600 a week of pandemic unemployment assistance for the next four months on top of your existing state benefits. I did some research though, because I thought that the four months went past the July 31 deadline. I thought he just had to apply for unemployement by July 31, but technically right now under the CARES Act, the pandemic unemployment assistance, the extra $600 a week actually ends on July 31, no matter when you apply for unemployment. So if you're applying for unemployment now, it's technically the end at the end of July.

Dyalekt :

I mean, this is one of the reasons why we've been telling folks is like, apply for the stuff that you can apply for right now. You may not like the system, you may not like the folks where it's coming from and you may even feel guilty about like, Oh, I don't know if I need it right now. Well, if you were gonna need it in the next six months, take it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, well, and also they are there is a bill on the floor right now to expand unemployment again, because as we're seeing July 31, is not any good indication of whether or not the economy is going to be able to come back and hire people. So if you're a freelancer, or self employed or a gain worker, who didn't technically have an employer, you're allowed to apply for state unemployment from now until December 31 2020, actually. So you apply for the pandemic unemployment assistance, and that goes till July 31. And then you still get state benefits on top of that. If you are unemployed, and you're a freelancer, you have been able to get gigs you have to claim unemployment every single week, every week, every week claim unemployment. They also for people who are just receiving unemployment applied a couple weeks ago or two months ago, or whatever it is, they are doing back in employment. They're emailing people, they're emailing people documents. It's like a DocuSign email where they're saying sign this, and we'll give you back unemployment. So look out for that email, too. They are coming. They're working on it. I'm saying this for New York State in particular, but we'll see what happens with other states. Other states are getting it together as well. Finally. There still is no real instruction or guidance on what to do about the whole looking for a job thing. Continue to document your inability to work in some form so that you have some explanation that you can give, it doesn't feel like you're pulling it out of your mind. If you can put things into your calendar. If you can have things in email stuff that's verifiable, go ahead and do that. All that you can do and also think about your capacity. All that you can do is write some stuff in your notes app. That's cool. So yeah, yeah, exactly. So the other thing is PPP loans. Those are still available. There's still money available. So whether or not you're unemployed you can actually apply for a PPP loan. If you're a freelancer, if you're self employed if you have a small business as of last week, there's still 140 billion dollars left for PPP loans. Brunch and budget got a $50,000 PPP loan. So it is something that's possible in the second round. And it's based on, if you're a freelancer, it's based on what your income was last year on your schedule C. So you're allowed to apply for up to two and a half months worth of what your income was last year Schedule C. All you have to do is go to a bank, they're gonna help you calculate the amount and then the amount that's forgivable right now, hold on one second. multitasking. All right. So the amount that's forgivable is up to eight weeks of income plus, you're also able to write off health insurance premiums, utilities, Home Office expenses, all that good stuff. So really, the other thing too is if you can't get all of the loan forgiven for PPP, the loan terms are amazing. It's 1% for two years that you can pay off the remainder of the loan. You're going to be able to get some of it forgiven. So it's absolutely worth it to apply for PPP. It's absolutely worth it to apply for unemployment. And the way that unemployment and PPP works if you're a freelancer is you can apply for an employment until the day that you get your PPP well, then you have to pause on employment for eight weeks, and then you can get back on an employment after that. So the timing is tricky right now, since the deadline is July 31. The deadline to apply for a PPP loan is June 30. I also think truly and honestly there has to be something that follows the cares act after this right to the protests after the mass unemployment. COVID is still a real risk. And so I think that the economy's not going to open up by July.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, I've been saying this a lot lately on the show. And just as a reminder, if all of this stuff sounded confusing and scary and you know that you have a lot of money up in the air based on that you need to be able to quickly please speak to a finance professional. It can be brunch & budget, it can be someone else, whoever that you trust. And you know, will walk you through it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, absolutely. So that's the update on income for PPP loans and unemployment. We just wanted to make sure you all have that information. Because we do want to go into right now, why black entrepreneurship, and business ownership is critical to ending the racial divide.

Dyalekt :

You've been seeing a lot of stuff being posted about, you know, supporting black businesses and talking about black Wall Street and all this historical stuff. And I think a lot of people are like, Well, yeah, black people are being killed and hunted down by police. So yeah, we want to support them. And like the economic thing just sounds like you know, it's like on the side like, yeah, you know, we're just doing that to be good neighbors. But it's not that. Actually there's a defined and better real reason why we need folks to start supporting black businesses. It's not that it's a brand new thing. Like we needed folks to start supporting black businesses years ago, but I like to think of it like the environmentalist say the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, the second best time is right right now, and that's what it is. If you are now moved to support some black businesses or pay attention to things that you didn't before, please, let's go ahead and do it. So this is what happened guys to break things down really simply and we can have an expanded conversation about it if you want. Desegregation in America was extensively a good thing I say extensively because it was supposed to be a good thing. It sounds like a good thing. And in certain ways in social ways, there were lots of good things about it. We were allowed to be around each other could use the drinking fountains in the bathrooms and all that social stuff. But economically, things didn't end up working out. Because what happened was, there's a bit of a negotiation when it comes to desegregation. When we were segregated, black folks had their own businesses, their own banks, their own grocery stores, their own car, their own, they had their own everything. And then when it ended black people were like oh, well then that means we can shop at the white grocery stores. If we want. We can go to the white owned banks, we can buy things from my own artists. This is great. We will now be able to buy from everything all of America. What happened on the white and is to a huge degree, white people did not patronize black businesses. So they weren't going to black banks. They weren't going to black clothing stores. They weren't buying black art from the painters there on the walls. So what happened was, you know, capitalism, those industries failed. We even saw this in education. It was really harmful education where we lost so many black teachers, specifically black male teachers, because white parents were afraid and unhappy with sending their children to schools where there were black teachers.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Wow. So if you ever wondered why 80% percent of teachers are white?

Dyalekt :

Yeah, we have so few black male teachers. Oh, I forget the percentage, something like 4% or something like ridiculously small. It's one of the reasons why I make sure I still teach as light skinned as I am. Because we don't have as much and it's because we had plenty, people didn't patronize them and by the rules of capitalism they went away.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So black business basically you're saying desegregation only work one way?

Dyalekt :

Yeah. I mean, when you look at things like, you know, black Wall Street and the the fire bombing that happened and these attacks, you saw this in Wilmington and other areas, you know, there are these very direct attacks. Were on a simple consumer, I don't even have a problem with these people. I just don't want to be around them kind of way. That stuff where it's like, I'm not just I'm not racist. I'm just not down with them.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Wow. So black people, basically, went and patronized white businesses, but white people did not go and patronize black businesses.

Dyalekt :

And not only that, I mean, there was the art and the media and the harmful stuff that was added to it, which was, don't patronize black businesses because they will be harmful, they will be inferior, and they will not help you. And guess what, not only did white people listen to that, but black people did too because propaganda works. So when you hear, this is something I don't know if you heard enough around you but when you hear in the black community, my black folks you'll know about this folks will be like, Yo, I don't want to go and buy from a black person because black people be doing this and this and it Don't be working out. They want to ask you for more money and it shoddy your service. All this stuff. I've heard this hundreds of times in every single industry. Oftentimes not true, but it's because of this propaganda that works. So well. Not just on white folks, but on all of us. Yep. Wow. It's a lot, right. Like there's a lot like I said, we can get deeper. Yeah, I mean, that's why what it was called by leaders at the time and continues to be was, was like the defacto segregation. Oh, it's just like how in schools right now, New York City is currently more segregated than before Brown versus Board of Education. Yeah,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

yeah. No, because it economically segregation still happens. I feel like that's the biggest thing about this is you can pass all the policy you want but if the economics make it so that black businesses can't stay afloat because white people wont patronize them then that's it. Right? That's the way capitalism works. So today we want to talk about how to really put your money where your mouth is, because it's something that feels difficult to do. I feel like people have tried I remember like killing Mike Netflix, they made a lot of buzz because he tried to like patronize black business for a day. And he said, It was hard. I didn't watch it. I mean,

Dyalekt :

You know, it is it is hard. Thats the thing of it. Like, you know, I really appreciate it. I don't always agree with the stuff that Mike is saying about, you know, should we arm ourselves and things like that. But I really dug that he was like, let's do the work. And let's walk through it, especially with this platform, and show how difficult it is. Because one thing all of my people, especially black folks, right now, I want to give y'all some room to have empathy with yourselves. If you have not spent your whole time and life supporting all these black businesses in every industry. We understand it is difficult. The system has made it difficult capitalism and the meaning behind it has made it difficult. You know, we always talk about Oh, black folks just need to pool our money in this one thing, and do that other thing, and Know, that requires so much unity, and that requires so much sacrifice. And that requires so many people willing to not put themselves first. None of these things are tenants of capitalism. None of these things are things that we were taught that we're supposed to do. Yeah, let's go to a song. Like on the real. I want us to have empathy with each other and ourselves. It's like, it's okay. Yeah, it's okay. And we can do better today, and we will do better tomorrow. And that's how we do everything in life.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, like how can we reverse this right? How can we undo this? How can we move forward from this.

Dyalekt :

I'm gonna go to Deutschland Berlin, Germany. Got lots of homies out that way. There's, you know, shout out the O line and eo de Berlin and all the great hip hop is out there. There's a cat called LMNZ, LMNZ, and he's got a song with Blake Waro, CMC, Fani and several other international artists from all over the world with a song called what's important. Because when we're talking about putting our money where our mouth is our values, that's this whole thing and this means so much to us here at brunch and budget is making sure we spend our money and put money towards the places that are important to mean something to us. We'll do we'll put that on and we'll answer a few questions. Yes, yes.

Song :

Elements what is important to you? The elements are steady focus on the text I buy does my shopping bite on time to you Passing by self does lame. Duck looks silly but it's a perfect time. Two minutes in Milan but several things. vein but these are companies that are paying for sleeping the young saying I'm hungry Thank you sue Jessica Ziggy ga me talk. Sophia look forward or backward with openness to make my own vision stand to the true thoughts that own mission I was thinking such a fun question came into my life and happened to me when I was only a little guy looking for money all the way with a leg up cuz that's my game in San Antonio. Yes ma'am. All strapped with the punch lines buzzing around comments Taking the time to shine. I broke my life. It's time to reach new heights. So right off the bat some of thethings like these we gotta understand basically we lead our own feet doing what we can spacelessby skin no doesn't mean Patricia Barton can own this by itself Nice to see my neighbor pawn shop to Bangkok the sellers have just bought on them on the single mindedness I'm kind of tough on here Mr. bata man See you later

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Actually in lieu of questions today Oh, I wanted to just mention some places that you can donate right now. I know a lot of people are looking for places to donate and I know a lot of bail funds like the Minnesota bail fund the Brooklyn bail fund specifically said that they have too many donations. And so they're asking you to donate elsewhere. And there are some places that you can donate in general, we recommend that you donate to as locally as possible. Because really, this is a nationwide thing. And I feel like the biggest impact that we can make is locally. You know, your neighborhood, you know, the people who need help. There's a lot of local mutual aid societies, they're still delivering groceries to elderly people, because of COVID. They're still delivering groceries to families who can't afford them who can't go out because they have kids or childcare or anything like that. And so start with things like a Mutual Aid Society, because that they're really covering the basics and on the ground. Campaign zero is a campaign that is working to end policing in general. And they're really great organization right now that is working on a campaign called 8 Can't wait where they're eight different criteria that they have that they recommend police departments implement, to reduce police brutality that's happening. I know he's so excited about it. Yeah. other stuff. Other songs you play on Spotify?

Dyalekt :

Oh, yes. So the songs I get, some of them are on Spotify, we get them from I create dig through Bandcamp because you find a lot more indie cats who don't have the money to put stuff on Spotify. So some of the songs are on Spotify, you'll be able to hear them when the show goes to podcasts. And I'm happy to share all the information from all these artists because they're great indie artists who talk about a lot of really important things that we have on the show. Yeah, I also wanted to shout out real quickly as we're shouting out places to put money when we're talking about putting our money where our mouth is and spending with black businesses. One on the podcast tip if you want to see podcast created by people of color, podcast and color is this amazing organization.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Holler if you want to follow him on Instagram, yeah,

Dyalekt :

they're on Instagram, they're on Twitter and they put out there a directory of every single podcast made by people of color and has been broken down into categories. Also on the money tip where you're putting your money where your mouth is, one there's a lot of places we're building directories. But what I wanted to start out with and I'll shout out a few other ones during the program is the Official Black Wall Street App. OBWSApp is on instagram and Twitter. They have been for years building themselves up. They call themselves the largest directory and they've been building since before it was becoming popular to start putting this directory together. So they're a good place to start.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yes. And not from Kansas. I love your comment, go vote with your dollar. Exactly. And that that's really, we have a lot of power with our dollar. And I feel like go vote with your dollar can feel like what does that mean? How do I start? Where do I start? And let's talk about that. I think that in general, it's hard. We're taught to spend pretty mindlessly. We're taught to spend using convenience, we're taught to find the best deal. We're taught to say, Oh, I can get it cheaper here. So I'm gonna get it cheaper here. And I think we're not asked a question. Who is that? What is that costing us in other places? Right? Well,

Dyalekt :

I mean, the long term like even monetarily, I remember one of our first episodes years ago was about Walmart. And I remember and you guys know, you probably had conversations with friends where you're like, well don't shop at Walmart because they're terrible to people and they go but it's cheaper. But if you really do the math, since our tax dollars are paying to subsidize the welfare of the folks that they refuse to pay, it's literally not cheaper. It's not and we need to be looking at these things from these larger lenses. Greed is short sighted. I like to ask folks like, feel free to want your money and all that, but think about it in the long term. Yes.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, glow up gang resource. Black woman get notified to get a 30 minute resume review session with a recruiter at bit.ly/hireblack, right? Yes. That's amazing. Glowup gang. Basically, I just got to shout you out. Because I know you did some insane legwork this week. She basically got what like 50 recruiters to agree to do free resume sessions with black women in two days. Or I guess over multiple days now. But if you need resume help when you're a black woman, go to bit.ly/hireblack. That is amazing.

Dyalekt :

By the way, I'm loving how a lot of people are pushing things around Juneteenth. Shout out to Claudia Alec, a great poet playwright who's been pushing that for many, many years, I'm a big fan of Juneteenth. I love how people are like, let's take this and make this our holiday cuz we've accepted holidays that are made to commemorate people we don't like Thanksgiving and just be like, hey, it's a day off. We're gonna chill with our family and enjoy it. But let's take Juneteenth and be like, this is our thing. And do stuff with it. I love all the energy around it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, I love it. I love it. I love it. Okay, so how do you start actually putting your money where your mouth is? How do you start voting with your dollars? I think the first thing to think about is you teach this thing called the spending values matrix. And it is a way to think about your budget and a way to think about your spending, not using a spreadsheet not looking at numbers, but to first start with your values.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, for our business majors. By the way, we took it from the productivity makers.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, so there's four different categories. We have the basics, and the basics are things like your rent, your utilities, your transportation, your cell phone bill, your internet, all of that stuff. And yes, we will make the post with the links. Yes, we will add a post with the show notes for everything that we discussed. And this is going to be on our podcast and it's going to be on IGTV. Great question. I love it. So the basics are these things that you need to survive that you need to functionally and physically purchase to get through the day, essentially. And those are things where you're like, Okay, I decided, like, this is what I need, I need to live in this place. I need to have this internet, I need to have this cell phone. One thing to think about is with the basics.

Dyalekt :

These are often called your fixed expenses. Yes.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Can you examine your basics differently? Now? Can you look at your basics in a way to think about is there a way for me to align my basics to my values? Sometimes the answer is no. Often the answer is no. Because you can't necessarily choose your utility company. You can't use your internet provider. You can't use your cell phone company necessarily, because they're all kind of the same.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, there aren't that many. I know there are, by the way, there are people who are working on these things and feel free within your bandwidth, if you can support those. By the way, if they're small and a startup and you know that your business or everything will fall apart if they fail, then it's okay if you can't support them. Yeah,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

exactly. So those are the basics. But the next category is the details. And the details are really where you can start living out your values. And figuring out how you can put your dollars towards things that you care about. Usually we talk about the details is things that feed you emotionally. Those are the kinds of things where you don't need to buy a cup of coffee every day, and it's okay to do it. And you don't need to buy take-out every week, but honestly, I've been seeing a lot of people say like, there just needs to be one meal or I don't have to do the dishes. And I'm just gonna, I'm just gonna order in. And that's it. Right. And so the details are the things that feed you emotionally into the self care. They're the things that we tend to feel guilty about buying because we're told that we don't need it. They're not necessities, right. And so the details are the place that we also have a difficult time examining because they're so variable. We don't know how much money is going towards those things. We know what our bills are, we know the fixed expenses, but how do we look at our details, and so the details are also the place that have the most wiggle room. And in the sense of like, where you want to buy things and where you want to put your dollars, this is kind of where to start thinking about it.

Dyalekt :

If you've listened to us talk about this stuff a lot, you've heard Pam mention before in workshops, and on the podcast, how she used to get manicures, when she was working at her nine to five, because she needed to get out of the office, she needed to deal with something. And then when she started her own business, she didn't need it anymore. Yeah, and I want us to think about that, too. There are a lot of stuff, a lot of treats that we give ourselves to get by in this awful world of white supremacy, and sexism and homophobia and what we do with our money if we didn't need to spend it on this coping mechanism.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

And we're in an interesting time right now to actually see what that looks like. Right? Hello, a lot of us actually because of COVID stop spending money on things that we thought were things we absolutely needed to have. And I think this is a really good time to examine what you don't miss right? What are the things that you used to think you needed every day and don't miss? I didn't miss those manicures as soon as I decided I was going to quit my job, but I decided I would rather save that money. Right. And so what are the things right now you're like, you know what I really do like cooking every day. You know what, I don't really need to go out and get this thing every single week, whatever that is. Take note of that. And also take note of the things you do miss and make sure you put those things back in your details as well.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, and think about how they can be done in a way that is the community. Yeah, I think that's the thing and what that means for you let that be personal to you. But if you have something that you're wanting to purchase, and you can think about, well, does this feed my community? And if it doesn't feed my community and I don't feel like I needed that maybe we can let go of these things. If it's something where it currently be near community, but it could and it should, then let's look for the people who will do that. Yeah, you know, we're not really coffee drinkers. So y'all know some black owned coffee spots. Let us know

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

shared share, please. The next category in the spending values matrix is the nothing. And the nothing is where all that money goes that you're like where do I get my money. That's usually the amount that you're spending that feel that makes it feel like you're living paycheck to paycheck because dollars that you don't even remember spending it's purchases you don't remember making is that like, I have a confession, y'all. I have literally woken up in the middle of the night, bought something on Amazon and fell back asleep and then it showed up two days later. And I was like, when did I do that? I did that. And that's the thing is the nothing is it's so easy right now to spend money. It's so easy to click on your phone, it's so easy to swipe your card, it's so easy to just like have everything saved and just buy something and then not think about it again. And often. The reason why we want to spend money and feel compelled to spend money is because we have this feeling of control that we need to have in the moment. Everything else might feel totally chaotic right now. But right now I know that I can spend this money and feel like I have a little bit of control.

Dyalekt :

I remember when I was a little kid and I would see the TV show where the character would lose their job and then they would go to a bar and a kid I was like, Wait, how can they do that? Because they just lost their job. You're not getting the you know, they probably still have enough for like a drink or two but still and the reason behind it why someone would do that thing or shopping or something like that. So they feel like they're in control. They feel like an adult again. Yep,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

yep. And that's something also to forgive yourself on and to give yourself permission to do because that's just gonna happen. Right now is a time where nothing feels like you can control it. And so it's okay to spend some of those dollars that way. But is there a way for us to think about the details and the nothing category as Hey, how can I take a little bit of control right now and also figure out how I can take control in the long term. Because really, when it comes to aligning your spending with your values, that's you taking control of your dollars on a regular basis and feeling like that you know, where your money is going? Because it's one thing to feel in control in the moment. And then often we're like, oh, shit, I bought that. When did that happen? I don't even remember, you end up feeling out of control later anyway.

Dyalekt :

And a lot of times in that same kind of thing. You felt like you were in control and you bought something then you found out who owns that company and you're like, Oh

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

my god, I love this comment, not from Kansas adulting and budgeting be like hard core sometimes. For real for real Oh my god, it's so true. And that's, that's the thing is like, it's always a moving target. I feel like that we're always taught when it comes to finance that, like you're going to reach this goal and then you'll be financially successful. And that's it right. And that's never the case. And I think the thing to think about when it comes to your finances isn't so much I'm trying to reach a goal. It's not about results. It's about how you identify yourself. It's about how you identify your values. And that's okay, that that's a moving target. And that's okay, that that changes.

Dyalekt :

If you've gone through a fitness program and worked out into the shape that you want, you know, that in the beginning, they're like, Oh, it's gonna be you're gonna be really sore, and it's gonna hurt but after a while, it's gonna even out you're gonna feel okay. And then you start doing it and you're into it for three years, and you're like, wait, why am I still sore after the stuff, I would still be sore after this stuff. It's just gonna be worth it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

It's an ongoing thing and what's really great. So one thing that's really great about that, though, is as your values evolve, your spending can evolve to and your ability to spend and where you can spend money. I want to kind of talk about to practically transition into this stuff, because I didn't even get to the last box yet. And the last box is the yes box. The yes box, it practically translates into a savings account. But we call it the yes box because it is the box that allows you to say yes. It's the box that allows you to say yes to covering unexpected expenses to paying for opportunities. It's a box that helps you get above water.

Dyalekt :

We do this a lot with young people. And one of the main reasons I wanted it to be called the yes box is because I'm tired of people telling our kids, especially our black kids that they need to save for an emergency fund. That's all I hear is emergency fund, rainy day fund save for when it goes bad, you know, it's gonna go bad. They want us all the time to get our heads above water and just tread water. And I want us to reach for more. Yeah, that's why we call it that's why it's an opportunity box. Yeah.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Your opportunity fund. Oh, this is a great question from Nasha15. How do you guys find the balance between investing in something versus saving? like long term versus short term costs?

Dyalekt :

Excellent question. Thank you so much. Fantastic.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

The way that I think about investing versus saving is saving is money that you can access right now. It's money that's liquid, right? And liquid basically, is the industry term. Yes, I can actually right now without any penalties or having to worry about where the market is, and investing

Dyalekt :

it that you have to wait on, it's not liquid.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, exactly. It's an investment for three years into this product. And so when it comes to saving, we want you to prioritize saving, and getting to the point you have a savings cushion that you feel comfortable with. So you can say, Okay, if I have this much in savings, then if I couldn't touch my investment account for the next five years or 10 years, I'll be okay. And the thing about safe investing is it's long term and it's a decision that you need to make and say, if something were to happen, and I needed to access money, I'm not going to access this money. That's how to think about investing. Investing is very much like I'm investing money for this particular goal that is going to happen in five years or 10 years. years or 20 years or whatever it is,

Dyalekt :

Even if you're investing in your friend's restaurant, you know that there's not going to be an immediate return. So your looking at that money is something that's lost for now and could possibly last forever because, you know, hey, you know if it's gonna happen.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

That's the other thing about investing is with saving, there's not a risk of losing that money. You have to use that money if you had to take care of an unexpected expense, but there's no risk of potentially losing that money. With investing there is that inherent risk and so you also need to be okay with knowing that that risk is there and you have time to wait to potentially recoup those costs. That's why I usually say for investing, you want to be in the market for five years you want to be in the market for 10 years because we don't know what the market is going to look like next month. We don't know what it's gonna look like next year and so we want you to have that savings cushion first. So you're not looking at your investments and like biting your nails in case you need the money.

Dyalekt :

You know, there's an industry standard of what three to six months of having saving for you know, that you really got some savings and if that sounds good to you go with that. If that sounds like not nearly enough, it's okay to save more. Yeah. If you feel like you can deal with more risk, that's cool, too.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah. And that means maybe you only have one or two months worth of savings before you're like, Okay, I think that my job is stable enough that I can also invest. And those are the kinds of decisions that you can make when you think about things in terms of your values. And also in terms of like, what you need to feel safe and secure.

Dyalekt :

Can I get definition-y here for a second here? As we talk about risk and risk tolerance, it's something that you know, that's industry finance terms, and it's also a colloquial thing, right? And for a lot of folks risk and risk tolerance means like, Am I brave? Can I be brave? And I want you to understand that in terms of your finances, it's not about your bravery or your intellect.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Risk tolerance technically means how much risk you're willing to take are comfortable taking within a portfolio. But practically what it means as an investor is how much time are you able to leave the money in the market, if you're able to leave the money in the market for a longer period of time, you can technically take more risk because market cycles tend to last for five to seven years. So if you have 20 years to invest, you have three, four market cycles that you end up being able to go through before you have to actually use that money. And so the longer you have to invest, the more risk you can actually take in investing. Risk is not a matter of how you're feeling necessarily. It's a matter of how much time you have to invest in what your goals are.

Dyalekt :

So basically, you know, we talked a lot about how wealth is a measurement of time in a similar kind of fashion. Yeah, so wealth is the money that you have based on that and risk in that time money system. That is your horizon. Yeah, you kind of build the idea of what your wealth means.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Exactly. Okay. This is a great comment. Yes. But also the saving notion became popular when the nuclear white family could afford to pay for their family and still have extra. It's kinda hard to do that. Is there an easier way to manage that? You bring up such an amazing point, because back when the government was subsidizing a white middle America, they were

Dyalekt :

giving advertising the idea. Yeah, read and watch and all that

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

You could afford to feed a family of four higher health. You could afford to go on vacation. You could afford to send your kids to college, to work through college to work through college and be able to pay it off, because the cost of living wasn't that high. What's happened over the last 20, 30 years is the cost of living has increased, but wages have stagnated. For instance, the federal minimum wage has been the same since 2007. The federal minimum wage is $7 and 25 cents, there's still there's states that have enacted higher minimum wages, but the federal minimum wage has not changed since 2007. for 13 years, it stayed the same and it's $7 and 25 cents. What the hell can that buy. You can make more money on unemployment right now. Then working on minimum wage job,

Dyalekt :

I'm like, I'm trying to think about the, in my life what I have, that's the same as 2007 I can think of anything.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

And that's before the last recession. So that needs to change too. So I mean, that's the thing you're right, it has become harder to save because student loans have gotten more increased. It's been more expensive to rent homes it's been more expensive to just like buy things and so what do you do about that?

Dyalekt :

Yeah, and and also socially, we've been taught not to say we're not socialized to save all of our art is around spending money. Even when we talk about saving money. We're not really saving money. We're like, Oh, I spent less on this shirt than I meant to spend. not saving money. That's one of the difficult things there too, is that we're incentivized to spend money. I even saw that that little dickie song about saving money he had like this rap song about saving money. And the whole thing of that is a song about how Look at me nerdy white guys who saves money while all the cool people of color spend it all. So even that reinforces, it was this anomaly like I'm such a weirdo, isn't it funny? I'm saving money with the same ferocity that people talk about spending money?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So to answer your question in terms of how to manage that it is an uphill battle. And it's something that you have to integrate into your own habits and integrate into part of your practice. saving. The thing that I remember reading this from the financial clinics website, shout out financial clinic and Darren, saving is not an amount saving is an action. If you identify yourself as a saver and you're someone who builds saving into your practice and into your habits, then whether or not you keep or maintain a certain savings balance doesn't matter. You know how to save. And if you identify yourself, as someone who knows how to save, then you're able to actually weather these storms and be more financially resilient because at the same time that we're hoping to like have policy change, and we're seeing these things happen and we're seeing these movements happen. To be able to take care of yourself in that time is super important. It's definitely a priority. So we want you to keep that in mind as well. The thing in terms of what it looks like to actually start to transition into spending with your values, I'm going to tell you a personal story right now. One of the things that we've been talking about in these months with COVID is how to stop using Amazon. I am addicted to Amazon. I confess it right now, I already told you that story behind literally woken up and bought something from Amazon and fell asleep. So we've been trying to spend this time during COVID to stop using Amazon. And it was something that we were like, we're not going to do cold turkey, but we're going to do a cold turkey. And we're going to take the extra time to even if it's another major retailer to spend money with them instead of Amazon. So we needed to buy something. Yeah, I don't remember what it was doesn't matter, but we need to buy something and we went to another big box retailer, and the item never came. And I called the retailer, I got the refund, whatever. But the first thing I said to Dyalekt was I was like we should just buy it from Amazon. That was literally the first thing I said was like let's just buy from Amazon. It never came from the other retail and it's not like Amazon has never lost a packet. Or something hasn't come on time, or I haven't been on the phone with customer service for hours trying to get my money back on Amazon or anything like that. But my first instinct when something went wrong with something else with another retailer was to say, let's just go back to Amazon. Yeah, it's freaking hard.

Dyalekt :

And to be clear my feelings on Amazon is that the only Amazon's I trust our, the lady, the rapper, Amazon who did the song Shadows with scarab. And the one from Timothy Leary, a newbie, not wonder woman, her sister, you know, Wonder Woman has a black sister. Oh,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I didn't know that. Yeah. All right. So our goal right now is to and I'm telling you all of this because I feel like that when you think about putting your money where your mouth is, I know my mind starts to go to hell. I'm not doing it right here. I'm not doing right here. I'm judging you right here. And I feel like I'm not doing right anywhere. So I get overwhelmed. I get analysis paralysis, and I just don't make any changes,

Dyalekt :

Which means that you're putting your money where Amazon is. Yeah. And that actually what you're saying? Exactly.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah. Oh Nazma, 40% of small businesses went under, right. Ooh, I'm not sure about that fact. Actually, if you have an article to reference that I would love to see it. I wouldn't be surprised.

Dyalekt :

Really, I saw that number on social media, wasn't sure where it came from. Yeah, yeah. I don't know if they mean went under doing COVID have gone under this year.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Are not opening again. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, that's, really and the scary thing about that is one out of two Americans are employed by small businesses. Small businesses employ half of the country right now. I think the fact that 40 million Americans are unemployed is because of the fact that small businesses didn't have the same support the corporation's had under the care act.

Dyalekt :

Oh, man, I hated that job creator myth that people talk about how big corporations was the ones who created jobs when really statistically that's not even true.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Small businesses were the ones that created jobs. So what we've been trying to do is anytime you want to buy something, or I want to buy something on Amazon, I actually stop and take the time to go and look for it somewhere else. So I have been, even if it's another big box retailer, my first goal is to get out of the habit of spending money on Amazon.

Dyalekt :

That's the first goal.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

And then the next thing is to figure out how to take it to Okay, how can I buy this from a small business instead of this big box retailer?

Dyalekt :

If you've heard us talk about your own small business, we often talk about your minimum viable income, and then the income that you would like to make your ideal income. And we think about this the same way. Yeah, the first thing the least you can do is to stop messing with Amazon and see who else whatever, and then work our way keep the eye on the prize towards wanting to make sure that we're supporting black businesses and make up for equitable.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah. And then now from Candice, do you guys have a direction for the youngest newest to adulting on budgeting and smart spending? I'm 21. I'm still working on budgeting. Oh, my God. It's a lifelong proces. Yeah. That's a really great question. I think the thing that I want you to keep in mind is...

Dyalekt :

It's all it's not too late at 21. It's also not too late at 41.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

It's not too late. It's not too early, there's always time. The thing that I want you to remember and I'll repeat this again, multiple times, because I have to tell it to myself is to just pick one thing at a time. You don't have to change everything. You don't have to redo your whole budget every couple months, because you're like, oh, it didn't work. I think just like I'm working on not shopping at Amazon. What is the thing that you think you can work on that doesn't sacrifice your well being that doesn't sacrifice your health, but isn't sacrifice your safety? Because if you're in a place where you have to shop at amazon, you have to shop at Walmart, because there's no other access to anything else? That's fine, right? I think I'm in my 30s and still working on budgeting. Right, a financial planner and still working on budgeting.

Dyalekt :

I remember when I proudly stated to a friend from the south that I don't shop at Walmart, and they were like, Well, I'm glad you got that privilege.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, it's a privilege to not be able to shop at these places in a lot of ways too. And so if you're in a position where you can Can't do that right now. That's okay, change one thing, because the thing we want you to keep in mind too is, how much extra energy do you have to be able to do that one thing or to be able to do those two things. ,

Dyalekt :

Well, and to give you the visual metaphor, changing that one thing is how you start a foundation. And you already have the foundation, this foundation of harmful things that have been put on you. And to build up something new, you're gonna have to start with the foundation. And just like the working out thing, it's still gonna be painful every time but it will get easier and will start to make more sense, which is the real important part. I think the thing of it is, we don't start making change when it's easy. We don't start making change. when it's convenient. You start making change, when it makes sense to us when it becomes real to us. And as you build this foundation, the next thing will fit into it easier because you've already got the base, and then the next thing will fit next to it or on top of that, and then it will make sense and become real to you. And that's when you're gonna do it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, exactly. And I think that the reason why I asked you to pick one thing is I want you to To pick a thing that you're actually gonna have time to concentrate on, because the reality is, we all have a finite amount of willpower to willpower runs out. And every time you have to make a decision to not do something that doesn't feel natural to you, that feels out of habit to you, it depletes a little bit of your willpower. And the last thing I want you to do is to deplete your willpower so quickly that you just go back to your old habits and say, Oh, well, that didn't work. Oh, well, that failed. So you pick one thing and you say I'm gonna put some of my energy and some of my willpower towards this then it's gonna be able to give you that momentum to be able to make other change.

Dyalekt :

Yo, so the thing is, is is right, it's not what can I do to make change? It's what can I consistently do?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I know I think it's nap time. Let's go.

Dyalekt :

Yes, let's do the song. Oh, yeah.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

After this, I want to shout out a bunch of black businesses and PLC owned businesses that we love to shop and we love to hear from you too.

Dyalekt :

So yeah, my songs that I got talking about the stuff that's Important it's completely out of the country. I talked about Deutschland, the first one and now we're in New Zealand with what's important from the album Ninja Scroll by Z O The lone wolf really dig the stuff that they talked about.

Song :

genetic makeup mixed with other stars as the sun shines Write from the ancestors to see the reason why you have so much reason to know nature previously Oh, no. No. returned and can be like the sauce to me story. So what's the meaning of that you believe in a soul? And if so people pray and go to war I think God says, Don't miss out. So lots to be say the mind of the sages wasted through aggravation from pain, what's meant to be paid in this long history of graves? What's your knowledge on this precious earth to this day? Do you really know? Maybe your capacity to graze it's not about affection the way you were made? It's how you sustain and navigate through this as if it were you from the sound design genetic makeup mixed with this DNA. This makes you Start from the top to see the reason why you have so much power to me I'm a quarter European your native puppies I spread my energy I don't care whether you're black white yellow orange if you're in a clan people love the land over and over and it says a person that you form of expression I'm so concerned that's it face it just means complacent with a human said preparation that is preparation in lots of regeneration. I can't taste it. I got to put out look and flavor has spread a positive natured chemistry to savor. It's hard to perceive when you feel your life's in danger and embrace with anger and is no one to tell no one to throw in the towel to you gotta fight for yourself. Hey yo, where are you from? Like genetic makeup mixed with the belief system to be the reason why you have so much power constantly broken. People band together if they believe in the same on the same page right a familiar name billions of others traveling a particular tree every day this is the app low cost to play the true definition of closed off in case of the likes of seeing the vision of going beyond the face beyond the ordinary ways Human display is more than this intricate brain the calculation is based on genetic makeup mixed with this DNA This makes you believe the sunshine POS system by ancestors to see the reason why you have so much power Do you think it's your bloodline?

Dyalekt :

And as far as shouting out the businesses, I wanted to start with the homie Siobhan Myers who has a website, blog thoughts musings thing called reflections in black that she'd been using for a lot of multi black purposes over the years, and is now converting it entirely into a directory for black businesses. So that's reflections in black. That's amazing. I think what's really great talking about one at a time If you are building your own directory of black business stuff, don't try to compete with these other ones. I don't think that's the point, right? I think capitalism again, kind of tricks us into being like we always have to compete. We're building stuff together. What's up with everybody coming on in, we're building all these things together. So start with your lane. If you have a creative industry or your professional industry, you know very well. And you can bring in people from that put that together. If you are a local organizer, or a person in the community where you know a lot of folks in different industries but in the same area, then start local. Put that thing together when you have your web.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

into POC businesses into black businesses is to write out what the steps are for you, right? Like what I said before my step is, I'm just going to stop buying from Amazon and see what that feels like for a couple months. And then I'm going to stop buying from big box retailers for this thing, and I'm going to stop buying groceries at this place. And then I'm going to stop and then I'm going to start looking for POC businesses where I can buy clothing where I can buy baby stuff, all of that kind of stuff. You write out what the steps are for you or think about them ahead of time, then you can see the end right, then you'll be able to see that it's not just Oh, this one step that I'm taking that's not leading towards anything. But you see, this first step is leading towards all of these other steps.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, you know, as we're shouting out black owned businesses, I see Freestyle Mondays. Freestyle Mondays is a black owned business owned and operated by Cory James Gray, who has been a hip hop MC for mad years has done so much for freestyle rap and this is the thing that means a lot to me. Because in hip hop, we don't have a lot of black owners in the rap industry. They're not black, a lot of black owners and in the we're authentic, do indie hip hop. I love all of my white friends who do authentic indie hip hop in the art world in the rap world as DJs and all that, but so many of these companies are not black on and this is one who does things for their community for everybody. So that's a great one if you're into art to support

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yes. And Monday at 3pmYeah, I think it's the finals. The rap battle finals.

Dyalekt :

Yeah this Monday,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

June 8 check it out everybody follow Freestyle Mondays NY. Okay, so the place where we got our face mask actually were two black owned companies shop Taylor J and Suzhou Clothing. They had amazing face masks they also have super fun clothes.

Dyalekt :

Yes, Suzhou's whole thing is about being non binary to so if you want to, if you're really interested in gender issues, they're great for that. If you saw me on my Instagram or came to my Museum of dead word show that polka dot jumpsuit that I was wearing that's them.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, love it. I love that outfit.

Dyalekt :

Oh, last Monday was the finals my bad oh dang it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

missed it.

Dyalekt :

Because we because we were teaching workshops and

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

If you are looking for kids toys shout out to Wordy toys. Wordy toys has beautiful bilingual kits toys. We might even have one of them here.

Dyalekt :

That one right there that yes.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh salsa.

Dyalekt :

Funny you put up the one where it's the same word in both languages but it's great language acquisition one has In English and Spanish, bilingual kids,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

This is the last Monday there's still time everybody. Freestyle Mondays June 8. Watch the final battle. It is so fun. I love it I love it I love it. I mean

Dyalekt :

They've been doing it for almost 20 years.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

yes yes please so hard for Andrew stuff yes check out Sousa clothing for real, for real for real. The Vitamin M Box we love them. The vitamin M M stands for melanin because their monthly subscription box full of black and POC owned businesses. So you can get a sampling of black and POC owned businesses and we love them.

Dyalekt :

You know, we actually haven't had them on in a minute which, you know, it'd be nice if they tell us if you think it's a good idea. We should just reach out to vitamin box and be like, Can you give us every episode a couple of businesses?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yes, I'm gonna do that

Dyalekt :

I'm saying. So yeah, everybody remember,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Eris foods if you want to do virtual cooking classes for you or your kids, she also does virtual cooking class for kids. She also sells spice blends. Spicy pickle chips can eat spicy pecans really she's an amazing chef Aires foods. Milky Mama LLC, this is special to my heart because Milky Mama LLC sells lactation treats that actually worked. I was having trouble producing milk and milky mama LLC is a black owned business and they sent me the most delicious lactation values I've ever had thank you very much nothing

Dyalekt :

mama LLC also who just stepped in the room see the homie mega Saif, who runs veterans for peace. He's a hip hop emcee tours around doing artistic work that has a fun to benefit veterans. I know he was a Marine, but I think it's for all veterans. So if that's something that's important to y'all, please get in that lane to a Peace Love you too, brother. Hell yeah, I love it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

And then everyday people shout out to everyday people who throw day parties and events focused on uplifting and celebrating the black initiatives POC community. Y'all are amazing. And right now they're just doing a lot. They have such a big platform and they're doing a lot of outreach and doing a lot of support. reporting and sharing information. They're awesome. If you are looking for I

Dyalekt :

Want to interrupt Oh yeah, just so y'all know that song ah and everyday people that whole song is about how black people are regular humans. Yeah, it's like 40 years old at this point. We've been saying this stuff. Oh,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Correction, a sec does it corrected in real time. I had you in the room for that. If you are looking for a yoga instructor who is focused on social justice through self care by Aditi Flow, Lauren Kelly Benson amazing. My favorite yoga instructor. She did a lot of pre and postnatal classes with me to help me get all of my shit together. And really and truly I felt so supported during the whole time and right now, she actually just did a black only yoga class and was asking for white and non black POC to support by giving donations that way. So if you're looking for a way to support as a non black or a non POC or white person, reach out to Lauren Kelly Benson. And if you are a black person who needs the healing space that's black only, that's yoga. Then go to learn Kelly Denson. They're amazing.

Dyalekt :

You know, by the way, black folks who are like, Oh, man, I love all these things. And, and I feel weird because like, I would love to join them, but I'm called to do other stuff, or I'm busy or I'm tired. And I can't even get myself up to do it. But I want to give some money to it. But I feel weird about that. That's okay, too. I know that we are asking our white folks to put in money but remember responsibilities, our ability to respond. So those of you who do have the extra cash if you want to support these businesses to like we've been doing all along. Keep on rockin

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, definitely, definitely. And then the pelvic floor playbook. If you're looking for physical therapy, she's amazing. She does do Zoom chats during COVID as well, if you're a little creaky right now.

Dyalekt :

The pelvic floor playbook. Yes. Yeah.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Iyana_therapy is actually a whole network of POC therapists. Right now a lot of therapists are doing video all therapists are doing video chat. And therapy is something that I feel like that a lot of POC communities have been taught to feel shame about and to feel like, Oh, I don't need therapy unless I'm a crazy person. And I think that the mental health movement right now has been so instrumental to us being able to face all of this stuff in a real way.

Dyalekt :

Well, one thing you know, black people, we as, I'm blanking the lady's name, I'll share with you guys who coined the phrase but there's a thing we call ptss Post Traumatic slave syndrome, where in the harmful things in our ancestry and in the stuff that we grew up personally, we have trauma. Our amygdalas are often poppin we are characterized as being angry and it because sometimes we flip it stuff. I know that I certainly have trauma around the N word. When I first heard it, there was a rock thrown at my head. And I kind of think like that every time I hear it, so no, I'm not okay with stand up comedians, just going off and saying those types of things. So remember that we are going through trauma. I went to the therapist for the first time I think last year two years ago, it was a white lady. She was very smart and very competent. But she looked at me very much as a fascination. And we were never able to really get into it. And I recently started working with a black person, therapist was black man, and Wow, I didn't feel that. And we're able to dig deep into stuff that really matters to me. I'm able to do better for myself, be okay with myself. Also, I feel like I'm already starting to be more effective in the things that I want to do for my community. So even if you're like, I don't want to make this about me, because I know we're always taught not to make it about us. You don't want to make it about you if you want to make it about us. Remember you part of us.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yes. And therapy is so important in generational trauma is real great. I love it. Thank you for sharing that. Oh my gosh, yeah, yeah. If you're looking for meditation that's focused on the black indigenous and POC experience that liberate meditation, specifically does meditation sessions for black indigenous POC.

Dyalekt :

This is a side thing I just saw Hebrew free loans society came in the building. Also Listen, Sonic was done with a glitch with the free loan society. I just put one of your songs on my niece's playlist. You just wrote her first rap and my sister was asking for dope lady to rap so I would be

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

dope ladies rap. I want to shout out to local bank, Brooklyn Co-op Federal Credit Union and Spring Bank, NY. We talked about PPP loans at the very beginning of this episode. And both of those banks have opened up there have opened up their resources to issue PPP loans to people even if you weren't an existing customer. So a lot of the barriers between being able to get a PPP loan was they would only work with you most banks only work with you if you're any existing customer. So check out Brooklyn court Federal Credit Union, they're the ones who issued my PvP loan and spring bank and why based in the Bronx, they prioritize small businesses when issuing these loans. They are in general issuing loans more than $250,000. So absolutely check out these banks, especially if you don't know where to go to apply for a PPP loan.

Dyalekt :

If you need a host for your event and Dyalekt is busy holler at Wordsworth who just came in. Not only Eudub but the pope would not be televised, those are two black open mics. Eudub has been running like as long as I can remember in different forms in different places. And they have seven days a week virtual content going on right now. Rest in peace to both majesty and vice versa. They've had a lot of losses during this time. Really great folks. And the poll would not be televised is another more poetry and r&b focused thing for my singers out there.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Blazing fix says Brooklyn Co-op isn't doing them anymore. Well check out spring bank. Oh, that's so sad to hear. I think Sunrise Bank has paused. Kabbage with a K i know is issuing them for sure. PayPal is still issuing them but they're checking your credit. So don't go there unless you have to. And then American Express is still doing them as well. I actually don't have it as a company. They're a new startup. And they're I heard from someone who said it was really easy to get through the loan process with them. And then American Express. I just liked that company. Honestly, I know they're like a big corporation but they have personally been really in terms of ease of use well, and they've been really good. Be a small business and also as a consumer Okay, so they are also doing PPP loans as well and spring hasn't returned my email yet check out cabbage with a K or American Express because those national companies probably have a more streamlined process. I think always start with a small bank if you can and if they don't have the capacity because they're smaller bank that is totally fine to go to a larger institution. I want to shout out National Black theatre for theater that tells authentic stories of black lifestyle there's a lot of there they're doing a lot of great just like Facebook live sessions on how to continue to think about theater during this time. Oh, and chases still doing it. Okay, Chase, you know, Chase, Yeah, exactly. You're right. Um, Chi Talent Management if you are looking for theater, TV and film talent management, ChiChi is the freakin best.

Dyalekt :

If you are in theater and are a person of color in New York and you don't know Chichi, then No you're not. Yeah, that's my whole that's my whole thing.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, yes. And this video will be saved in IGTV And also it's gonna air on our podcast next week. So yes, we will absolutely have this. Danny the Maven, Danielle flowers if you need the best publicist ever she's our publicist. And she's amazing. She's the reason anyone cares that we do stuff. Yeah, it's true. And we shouted out Glowup gang co. at the beginning who if you weren't here at the beginning, asleep if you weren't here at the beginning glow up gang did this amazing thing where she reached out to LinkedIn and found a bunch of recruiters that are willing to do free resume building for black women and give you 30 minute sessions. So sign up at bit.ly/hireblack if you need your resume reviewed and you're a black woman amazing. And they do a lot of free virtual workshops on career finance, relationships, self care, just a really great community that's being built. and oh, there's some other shout outs that people listed a trade Oh, trades tea jam company for amazing most sugar vegan jams. Yeah, I love it. Trade s t jam. co

Dyalekt :

Rafi K. k s for t shirts and merchandise printing and then you can also donate to BLM in Los Angeles. Movement for black lives and Black Lives Matter directly. Don't forget Black Lives Matter is an organization as well as an ideology as well as movement for black lives. Next Wednesday is the 10th beginning at 3pm. Megaciph from Brittany Chantele will host weekly live streams for active duty military trying to figure out how to disobey orders. More info on that too. Thank you mega,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Megaciph for more information on that, thank you for sharing that shortening

Dyalekt :

of a of a large cipher.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, yes, exactly. And cooligans.co.uk, for awesome clothing. and then oh, local csh for food delivery. That is amazing. Yes.

Dyalekt :

Your local farms

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

We actually love Imperfect Foods. They're so so great. They've been delivering groceries to us like this whole time and that's how we've been able to even feed our child. Thank you, Daddy.

Dyalekt :

Let's catch up soon. Yes, yes. Love

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

it. All right, we are running out of time. We are signing off. Thank you all so much. What's the last song guy? Oh,

Dyalekt :

yeah, I do have a last song. And it's fun because I like their names. All of this stuff is from outside the country. I appreciate that because you know, sometimes you need to step outside. And this is a song also called what's important. That's all the songs are titled today because that's what we want to talk about what matters to us, and it's by an artist named dielectrics, Australia. But it's also there. Anyway, thanks, y'all. If you have more businesses that you want to help promote and share, please share them with us. You

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

put the baby to sleep, everyone, thank

Dyalekt :

you. We'll talk to you next time next week.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Bye.

Song :

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