Brunch & Budget

b&b233: Does your salary reflect your value?

August 21, 2020 Brunch & Budget
Brunch & Budget
b&b233: Does your salary reflect your value?
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Brunch & Budget
b&b233: Does your salary reflect your value?
Aug 21, 2020
Brunch & Budget

MJ from Advisory Avenue joins us for this episode to talk about knowing your worth, how, why and when you should go to HR, approaching and preparing yourself to have "the raise" conversation and really proving and showing your value to a company during a pandemic!

Show Notes Transcript

MJ from Advisory Avenue joins us for this episode to talk about knowing your worth, how, why and when you should go to HR, approaching and preparing yourself to have "the raise" conversation and really proving and showing your value to a company during a pandemic!

Dyalekt :

Just like hot peas and butter and hot pics from your mother justice is best served from somebody who loves. This is brunch and budget the show about personal finance and racial economic inclusion with your host, Pamela Capalad. Certified Financial Planner and Accredited Financial Counselor here to take the bite out of your budget. I'm your sound provider Dyalekt. And here's your host, Pamela Capalad.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Hello, everybody.

Dyalekt :

You haven't had the baby on here in a while because timing.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

But he is not taking a nap today.

Dyalekt :

That is not happening. So he's part of the party today.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

He is partying hard. And we are super, super excited to have Advisory Avenue on the show. Thank you so much for joining us MJ. Well, we are talking about making more money? How do you make more money a pandemic? How do we do all this stuff?

Dyalekt :

How to negotiate, how do we hear the words of our work, especially nowadays where everything is getting thrown all over the place and people are asking you to cut your rate. I know that we've been asked to cut our rate in everything we've been doing. We will do the same gig for people and they are like well you're not actually gonna be in front of people and you don't have to get on the subway to go and do it. But like it's the same info, the same work the same decades of expertise.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah so it's that's been rough for us as freelancers and I'm so curious to talk about having my your salary and your how much your work is worth right now. And just in general. So just to give you some background Advisor Avenue is a human resources consulting agency that services individually companies on their HR needs in an accessible and affordable way, which I think is amazing.

Dyalekt :

A good old family saying that when people are talking about you, and then you show up, you're gonna live a long time. So that's the past because we will definitely talk about you the other day. We missed you too. And glad to have you back. Always awesome folks here sharing ideas and asking questions, please feel free to ask us questions in the chat if you have any concerns. If you have any ideas if you have something going on with you and something you need to sit down process with you can hit us up later all the socials all exist.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yes, we have questions for MJ but also please feel free to share any questions you have about salary and things like that as they come up and we will definitely ask them. So MJ We are excited to talk to you. I love that you talk about HR needs in an accessible and affordable way. I think that's such a huge part of why it feels like there's a gap is hrs feels and sounds expensive, right and talking to someone and having someone coach you through a salary negotiation feels and sounds expensive. So I'd love to learn more about you. Your background and why you started Advisory Avenue.

MJ :

Yes, so I've been doing this for over 11 years or something by now. I got into it by accident. I was originally going to school for like fashion and marketing and just like recession hit and i got into HR.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

The last recession right.

MJ :

The last one Yes, exactly. Last one. So I mean, I quickly found out like I've always been like a people person. I'm like super into psychology and then the organizational part of psychology just like fit perfectly. So 11 years forward I've been working in like different industries, as the HR person for different companies. And then I'm realized there's a huge gap between what people feel like HR does and what HR is supposed to do. So like, we are supposed to be like a resource to humans in the workplace. And I think sometimes that gets a little blurry depending on like, what company and people feel like, okay, is HR really there for me? Or is it just for the company and things like that. So I realized that the huge gap, people do want someone that can talk to you and help guide their career in the workplace. They just don't know if they can or should go to HR because people think of us as like the bearer of bad news all the time. So I started Advisory Avenue to kind of hit some of those points because one, personal consultants can cost a lot of money per hour. We're talking about like hundreds of dollars per hour, whether it's for the company, whether it's for the actual individual person, so I wanted to be able to do something that people can afford the average person like you and me like, Okay, I need help with this one off experience. Like, I don't know what they're saying, I wanted to call this email, what does my management says? How can I ask for a raise? How can I change my career path within the company? So that's kind of why started Advisory Avenue.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, that's amazing. You're like, HR on our side of the table.

Dyalekt :

Well, the thing about like, an HR isn't necessarily supposed to be on either side of the table. Yeah, just kind of like the IRS. Where is this thing where we think about it like it's the enemy that to to like, police us and attack us and interrogate us? When really they're just arbiters of the system to make sure that the structure keeps on running?

MJ :

Yep. I think the best way to put it um, I got a lot of comparisons to what HR is, but that's a good one.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah. I love what you said about that because because HR feels like the messenger, and you know they are coming from the company in terms of what policies they put in place and how employees should use HR. So I really love that.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, exactly like, Oh, you did something wrong. I'm gonna call HR about that.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, yeah. So the way that you know, outsourced it with advisory Avenue is just so needed, especially now. So let's dive in. I know that you had a formula for how to tell if your salary reflects your value. Can we talk through that formula? How do you actually know if your salary reflects what you're worth or what your work is worth?

MJ :

I mean, there's so many layers to it. So I think to start most people don't really know what they're worth. And by worth, I mean to the company, right? Yep. The what you're worth in terms of your title is one thing, what you're worth to that individual organization is a whole nother thing. So that's what I mean by that. So knowing your value to the company, and that's necessarily not just like, just your experience. It's like, do they care and can they hire another version of you? That's like the value aspect Do they like you enough to keep? Because we all know like most companies, it can be a little bit of like a politics game and politics include like personality, like do they won't even care to keep you? Yep. Right. So that's the first thing. So it's like knowing like, what your value is thinking and understanding. Are you okay with that value? Yeah. And then in terms of being okay with it just means like, what is this company to you? Is it your stepping stone? Is it what are they getting? You know? And also like, Is there a skill you possess that is different than everybody else in the company, if you're the only person that can do animation, and you're also an editor or something like that, and everybody else can't do that. Then you have a high value. Yeah, right. Yep. So that's the first part of that. Yeah,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

yeah. So it's the equation in case you haven't seen Instagram post is your unique value to the company one plus the industry standard two, plus the company revenue three equals how much you can negotiate and I think that the unique value to the company to

Dyalekt :

I love it. This is quantifiable thing where it's always especially when it comes to really unique skills that aren't things that the company thought was going to be necessary but have become really necessar, they are never paid well.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I think to what you mentioned about like, Are you the only x right? Because that's inevitable that's going to happen in a company where you are the only one on your team who can do whatever that thing is. And I don't think we think of those things as valuable because they're probably not our job description, right?

Dyalekt :

I can tell you how many times I've talked to people where they're like, I'm the only Spanish speaker this company and we unexpectedly had a lot of Spanish clients. And now everybody turns to me for that, even though that's not my job, but now it's a big chunk of my day. Yeah. And how to do you negotiate that? Like your boss didn't even have that as something that they hired you for.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

That's a good question, salary expert. How do you fit that into like a negotiation conversation, right? It's not part of your job description. It's not part of the actual growth trajectory of your position. So how do you quantify that?

MJ :

Yeah. So basically, you're able to quantify by how it's worth to the company. So if you, for example, are Spanish translator, no one in the company has been able to pull in clients because no one's speak Spanish and you've brought in 1, 2, 3, 5 clients, then you can say during your negotiation, like I've helped you land these x accounts and people don't think about that, like the person that's giving you your salary or your review or whatever. They're not thinking because it's not part of your day to day responsibilities, but then when you're looking at it, it's like you can't deny it like that's true. So like people you know, I always recommend when you are thinking about asking for a salary raise whether it's like a planned one because your reviews coming up or it's something that you just been overdue, you need to include those x factors because that's what makes people think that they deny that you've done

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, I love it. So to actually like formalize and make it official, it's not like always fixed Some of your clients sometimes like no, no literally made you this money.

MJ :

Exactly. And you don't even have to write it down for them per se, but write it down for yourself because you'll be able to articulate that correctly to whoever's giving you this raise. Yeah,

Dyalekt :

I want to follow up on that. Because like, Ireally love the idea of documenting it. Do you have any easy tips? Or like if I'm like, Oh, I don't know, how should I document that we're so put it down.

MJ :

If you want to present it to somebody or just for yourself?

Dyalekt :

Well for yourself in the beginning, like so you like you have it ready, so that if you need to bring it up later that you can go back to it?

Unknown Speaker :

So yes, there's like there's a few different ways. So I mean, depending on like, what the review process is at the company, there's probably a self evaluation form that asks these specific things like what have you done one through five, but if you don't, you can make your own self evaluation so you can list out the last in the last 12 months. These are the responsibilities that I've overachieved in and that would be one thing. So like I would list out five points of everything that you've done that you excelled in, because you're going to get a standard raise right cost of living But that can be anywhere from like zero to 5%, which is not too much. But if you're trying to really like hit a number that you know, you feel like you did there, that's not typical. You have to show what you've excelled in even if it's not part of your job description. So list five things at the most I think if you have more sure, but people really get like sidetracked after that, that you really excelled in that people can't deny that it's proven work. Hmm.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I love that like putting a cap because I'm the type person who's like here the 20 things that I've done this year and it's like okay, that's too what that'll take like the whole hour plus right

Dyalekt :

well I wonder about like your money personalities with this. If you've been listening for a long time we have money personalities and go to Russia budget comm slash personality and take the test but like for my money, monks as we were talking about this, I was feeling it in myself. And I was feeling other people being like, wait, I have to write down the things that I did good in. I'm not cool with that because that feels like bragging I have a question. So I have a request for you before you do that. If it feels like he's gonna make you nervous. To put on your favorite rap song where the rapper brags about themselves and you split that verse with them then after that you write that down because it's cool for them. It's cool for you.

MJ :

I agree Dyalekt. Sometimes I listen to like rap song just to get inspired and like motivate.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I love it. Yes. Put yourself in that headspace because it is so hard. It feels like bragging but it's really just like you showing evidence and like telling people like no, this is what I did. And if I left you there would be a hole.

Dyalekt :

And checking out the gaslighting thing I was talking about earlier because they do beat it in our head that we're supposed to be humble and like they use this common language of like, yes, it is a good thing essentially to be humble, to make it so that you won't share your value. Yeah. And I think that's the big thing of it. And you have to find where it is for you. What does that line between sharing your value and you know, being outsider?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, I love it. So let's talk about the next part of the equation, the industry standard. How do you figure out what your industry standard is?

Dyalekt :

Especially like in this gig economy world someone will undercut you.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, we're like they can get a freelancer to do it for less money, you know? Oh,

MJ :

Yeah, exactly. Especially companies that don't have a budget. They're definitely the lowest price for the consultants for sure. So, I mean, so before Corona right pre Corona, it would I would just suggest people always literally southie calm last door see what? Right. So if you are a financial analyst, look at what people in your specific city make at the same amount of experience as you right. So let's just take financial analysts make $75,000 in New York City. But now we impose COVID or during COVID right now, everyone's like, you know, so many people are applying to jobs that companies are unfortunately able to leverage and lower salary. So what you'll have to do is to say like what is my getting out of this position? And what is the lowest number I can work with for myself like living and compared to what am I getting from this company? So basically, you know, is this job going to help me do x Like a skill set isn't gonna look good on my resume isn't gonna, you know, what is it benefiting you? Besides the salary during this time only, you know, we can have a conversation after everything gets to some kind of back to normal kind of thing. But like during this time, it is super competitive. So you're going to try and you have to, like balance it out, like what am I getting out of this company besides salary?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

That is awesome. I feel like that that's kind of the biggest question that I know is weighing on a lot of our clients minds is like, I got this pay cut. I didn't get laid off. So I guess that's good. But also like they cut my salary by 20%. Like, is it worth staying? Right?

Dyalekt :

Yeah. And I think that's something, I asked that question when I've hired people even for like tracking positions, like, What can I do for you outside of the salary? And I found that that's one of the harder questions for people. So I think just like, like you're saying about just writing stuff down for yourself. That's another one to just be like, What, What is the answer to that?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah. And you mentioned skill set.

MJ :

Branding yourself to somebody else.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Got you. Like I worked at x company, which will look good on my resume no matter how much they're paying me so that I can go find another job somewhere else. What about things like more time off or other benefits are those things to consider to?

MJ :

Yes. So I would definitely say that weigh out all your options, so like compensation, benefits, perks, and all that kind of stuff. So like, you got 20% pay cut, but is your company still providing childcare? Or do they have a really good health plan, casue thats hard to find? Do they have a really good thing. what do you want to figure out like your personal goals for yourself? But like, what are you trying to get from them? And also, what can you leverage if you're getting a 20% pay cut? Can you do more projects. So then when you do want to leave you can say I've done X, Y, and Z This company and move on.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Ah, oh, it's good. I'm like, Oh my god, I hope you're taking notes.

Dyalekt :

For everything, just straight up make a goal chart, put your job bucket list and then when your job bucket list is finished, you can kick that bucket and move on to something new.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So good. I love it. What about the last part of the equation company revenue? So I don't I feel like that may have changed in general. But I also know I didn't have access to like my company's revenue when I worked at a job. How do you determine that as part of the equation?

MJ :

Yeah, so most people don't unless you're back of house like me or you're in finance, something like that. But how you can determine where your company is going is by what's happening in the company. Right. So how many layoffs are they doing? What protection plans are they putting in place are they doing salary cuts are executives people leaving the company? So if you, for example, see someone in senior leadership that's been there for a while, starts to exit whether or not they say they're leaving you never know unless you're part of like HR or something you don't know if it's an exit that was forced and like once you see those kind of people leaving like you can tell where the company's going you know once you start to slow down and work and things don't pick up and certain things are said like you know that the revenue from down right or hiring goes quickly down. So that's the way to tell as an everyday employee, like if you're hiring more you're getting more projects and seeing like, departments created not deplenished, then you're looking at upwards revenue.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, no, I love that. And I think too, because we all kind of know that and I think you know, when we see people leave when we see people get laid off when we see kind of people in management leave or get laid off. I think that we get that inkling and again, like you're helping us quantify it I think by saying like, okay, like no, this company is actually doing well during Covid, I should ask for a raise. Right. I have the space to negotiate. We didn't get salary cuts or they only cut her salary by X percent and then a bunch of people left there's probably room in the budget right? It can be as simple as just like observing those things which I think is awesome.

MJ :

Yeah, exactly. It's kind of like knowing your audience if you work for yourself. I mean you should be able to read your company like you're reading a room like you're reading a client and you should be able to say like, just understand that if a company thing out a huge email about salary cuts layoffs, you know that's not the right time like know what you're dealing with like be aware.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, no, I love it. That's great. Know your audience while you know your worth. So Dyalekt, let's go to a song.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, I figured that was the time you were going to put a song in. So before we're gonna do that, we got three songs called "Know Your Worth" that we're gonna be playing today. The first one comes from Nottingham in the UK. Excuse my awful British accent from Juganot, from The Six Bricks EP. Know Your Worth.

Song :

For the lucky few we've been taught who we really are, peace. Again when startsnow stop is a break brain state property change to create that change in the brain state changed, stay on top of the game to create that state. Stay close to the topics of race making. Use of face I'm amazed 24 hours a day to say taking power away from evil when times are hard to find fresh eggs. Every call is a story when you know you work my sister, my sister, my sister, right? To the challenge, they tried to get quality work. They tried to find the worst thing you can do. To stay true and be you below the truth. That's all you can do but love it, you know, again when it starts to change, a property change the brain to change to create that same state, which flows Kima into the street keep clear with a peacekeeping face on a leash. The week he finished to me and said on me, I scan you on the way running fully awake, so you know, but the pen is a sword and a coward sending the flowers a rebel with incredible powers. Take your stamps in a second. We'll go by The essence questions in the sentence my assistance from time traveling with restless I keep it simple the precious my Nexus is connect words to the breath when it starts to change to change the game when a start up in the brain to change the game or play to create that state you know true education is free all day all night you know knowledge is king. You can live black who wants to make money clean? education is free. Knowledge is key. You can live like a boss. You can make money you game Again when you change your game to create a game when it starts in the brain state to create that same state change, brain state change to create that same state.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

We're gonna keep rolling with MJ Advisory Avenue, please follow her on Instagram. Okay, so I want to ask the big question, if you never asked for a raise before. How do you do it now?

MJ :

Yeah. It's difficult.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

How do you like get yourself going? Or like rev yourself up?

MJ :

Oh, I mean, we can use Dyalekts approach about the music. But um, I think so the first way to like, like I said, awareness is very key in this. So if your company you feel is in a position where you can ask for that raise and they haven't announced like there's a salary freeze, because if you're dealing with a company that has completely announced to the staff, there's a salary freeze, there's no point right? You can have a conversation about in quarter four or next year, like I would like to revisit my salary and we can talk about how that works. But if your company is doing better in the pandemic right now, so and you've never asked, let's say, you've been in the company to three years, you've never asked for a raise, and what you need to do is first collect feedback from your manager. Because if you just come out of nowhere Three years later, never asked for a raise and you say I want to raise what do you what leg do you really have to stand on besides you saying I've never received one? Because you need to know where you stand with your manager with the company? Do they even think you've been doing good? Or do you think you've been just coasting and just like, oh, you're just another employee that we just keep on, you know, you have to understand, like, that's the first part of my equation, you have to know where your value is. And you will never know until you know, ask your supervisor or your manager, whoever, you know, is the person that you report into, to, you know, hey, how am I can we have a one on one next week? I'd love to know like how I'm doing and how I can help the company moving forward and see, like, am I hitting all your points and during that conversation, you'll figure out like, Okay, he's saying, I'm doing well, I'm hitting all the responsibilities he wants me to. So then that's your cue to say, Okay, I am eligible, technically, based off my performance for a raise, I feel.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Hmm, I love that. So the race conversation isn't like, Okay, I'm going to schedule a meeting with my manager and ask for Is there is like, you can feel it out first it sounds like yeah, you can like, okay, like, let's see if my manager actually thinks I'm doing good first. And then. So then between the feedback from your manager and like asking for that raise, are there more meetings in between? What do you need to do to prep to like, actually have the raise conversation?

MJ :

I think depending on like, your relationship with your manager, I think it could be in the same meeting, right? So if the meeting is that if the meeting is going, well, then shoot your shot, definitely, by having everything prepared. Right. So and, you know, you can say, you know, Pam, like you've been doing really well, you've been hitting all these things, meaning your quota, whatever it is, and then speaking as you I would say, Okay, well, you're saying I'm doing great. I've been here two and a half years, and I really have asked for a raise and I see the company is starting to do well get more prosperous, and I would really like a salary of x. Is that something we can talk about?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Huh? Oh, man, you just gave us a script like, is that something we can talk about? Because then it's like, Can I ask for a raise? And the hard no feels very defeating. And also like, where do you go from there? Right? Versus like, Oh, no, we have a partnership here, me and you manager, we're like actually having a conversation and I want to be, you know, I want to be part of the team in this way. Is there a different approach? Or do you need to approach things differently whether you're a man or a woman?

MJ :

There shouldn't be right. I

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I wish there wasn't.

MJ :

But yes, I think to be honest, there is. I think, depending on your personality, especially. I think women, and it depends on what industry, too, right. But for the most part, we all know the stigma that women are associated with getting less raises than men. And so there's a way to be forceful, but not come off as aggressive as well. And that's like the preparation I was talking about before. So come with your points, like no one can dispute a fact. So you know, you don't have to consider it bragging if it's factual, like, you don't have to fluff it up or anything, if you've done X, Y, and Z, then bring that to the table and say I've done all this, all of these things. And I feel like I'm at the place where I would like X amount of money. So and as a woman you need I think you need to really come with those points, like be accurate, as where as a man, I've seen that you can just walk into a room sometimes and say, well, I've done this, and like, it could be like one point sometimes unfortunately, and like, it can get it you know, but I would say for women, just be prepared. Be confident what you're saying. And just, you know, negotiation is key. Like you might not get exactly what you want, but if you don't negotiate your your butt off, then you might not get anything. Yeah, I think there's more negotiation from women.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, no, I I want to reiterate the point that you made about I feel like all the women who are watching like feel this so hard right now, the like, if you're a woman you have to be accurate. Like, you have to have your points, you have to have your numbers, you have to have those five points that you were talking about. And if you're a man and you have that relationship with your manager, you may just be able to walk in and be like, I did this thing. Give me more money, or I'm going to do this thing for you. Give me more money.

Dyalekt :

I put the baby down, give me more money.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

You deserve a raise. A husband raise, thats a thing, right?

MJ :

Yeah, exactly. And to bring back to your point about can you leverage benefits into that, that is something that I highly recommend to women and to people, men and women, that if they do ask for you making $75 and you're asking for $95, and they're saying we cannot go to $95, we can give you $82,500. And you're like, Okay, well, if I get $82,500 I would like three extra vacation days. I would like you know, negotiate it that way. Just you can throw in things like be prepared for the NO and have a backup plan for what you're going to ask after that,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

That is such good advice. I want to read Kas's comments my mother makes list of everything she did for the whole year. It's usually three to four pages by the end of the year. Yes, Kass's mom, any projects you do whether or not she's planning to ask for a raise, right and when you do that, you can just ask her whenever year.

Dyalekt :

One document I love and you know the thing about it, I was saying like, you know, the rap stuff and all this but like think about industries where people do know salaries and money stuff and make it part of the game. I mean, sport, think about sports, right? You will have, you know, your big star players who are making a ton of money, and then there'll be people who write articles about how much money they made for them. There's your bench player who's like the last person who comes in towards the end, and there are people who have projections and entirely quantified things about why they deserve to make the money they make. And if that's not weird that it's not weird for you either.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, I love that. I love that I love Kaz, your mom like doing like documenting stuff as you go because especially when you're getting ready to ask for a raise. There's a lot of emotion by Right, you're like, Oh my god, I pick myself up and it's easy to forget all the things you've actually done. So it's not like I'm sure it has your mom doesn't like show the three to four page document to her manager every year, but then you can pick out those five things that MJ was talking about. These are the big ones.

Dyalekt :

I wouldn't be mad at that.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Like PowerPoint right here. She does her bonus as well. All right. I love it. Yeah.

Dyalekt :

Make sense? So guys, again, they're not gonna do it for you. Since we're not pro athletes. We don't have someone else who's going to spend their time doing that.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, yeah, exactly. Oh, man. These are such good tips. Okay, so one of the questions that we asked we post an Instagram and we've gotten this question from a lot of clients actually. Um,

MJ :

okay, so basically, you're asking if I got turned down for every single possible type of opportunity for a raise, including benefits. What do I do? Right? Yeah. Okay. So basically, that's when the kind of how is this company benefiting you? Right? And that's where you go to see like, Okay, I'm not getting my raise right now, first of all, let's schedule a follow up conversation, ask them directly, when is this conversation going to happen again, like, that's super important, whether it's like, two months from now, or first quarter of next year, like you need to have a date. So you can circle back like, always have a follow up date of when and why they're saying no. After that, you need to figure out exactly why. I would say like, why are you working there besides the money, what is driving you to work there? And if that's nothing, then maybe you should just find somewhere else that will give you that money, right? But if there's other things, including like building your skillset, building, your resume, whatever, you know, things like that, and then try to leverage that as much as you can do more things like make yourself more part of projects like let your skill set shine until the follow up conversation because people will remember the way you behave when you're told NO for the first time.

Dyalekt :

Remember the way you behave when you're told no for the first time.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

wow now that's a frickin gem because that is so real right well cuz that's the thing is like no's always suck right? You're building yourself up you sweat all this time you gathered all this evidence you put together that presentation, whatever it was, you like had this conversation with your boss and your boss very sadly. probably had to tell you no. Like, what is the follow up? Right? How do you do get back in the game? Right? Are you a team player still or are you just like done? Right? Yeah, yeah. Oh my god. Wow. Okay, no, it is all about like, how how you take things right? Because even if you eventually leave the company, all the people there still know you and remember you and your reputation is still going to be there. Yes.

MJ :

Yeah, exactly. Yeah, exactly. And people remember it just within the company. If you're still there, though, remember, when it does come time to give you a review, or raise, and they'll they'll say, and a lot of more companies are doing 360 reviews, that means you're getting evaluated by not just your manager, the peers, you're around. So if you're in a bad mood, and you're treating your peers bad because of that, and everyone's noticing that you're slacking on your work because you didn't get that 10% raise then people are going to write about it. Yeah, they're gonna remember

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Wow, yeah, yeah.

Dyalekt :

And I want to shout out guys Kaz I was also thinking about this too. You know, there's there are times when you we you know, it's time to look for a new job.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Well, when is that? So I was like, Yeah,

Dyalekt :

what how do you determine that line? You know, we're just saying like, the boss may be like, oh, sadly can't do it. But just because they are a good performer doesn't mean that they're actually sad to do it or,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

yeah, yeah. So how do you know when it's time to actually start looking for something and

Dyalekt :

I know a lot of that is, it depends on It's personal. But like, I guess, what are some small things that we can hold on to?

MJ :

Yeah, I think it is personnel. But I think it's also like with the market, right. So for example, if I wanted to find a new job, this would be the perfect time, human resources in high demand. So if I'm not getting some type of fulfillment, versus sell whatever it is salary, what I'm doing, then yeah, this is a perfect time for me to go. And that's based on my personal feeling. And that's based on what the market is offering. But let's say you are working like PR, that's hard right now, and you don't get the raise, and they're saying they're not sure when you're going to get it. And you don't want to be there just because just because of the lack of the raise. Where can you go? What can you do, um, you know, you have to like evaluate both your personal needs and the market needs. And like if they don't come together, you kind of stuck for a little while unless you create your own space. So it's like you either have to find your own stream of income a second one, which I think you guys always say you should have more streams of income so like start your own things somehow or you unfortunately like you're just gonna have to play by ear for a while.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, I want to shout out some really great stuff from Kaz had a couple of notes too when you don't see any room for growth when you see people not being promoted when there's negative company culture that's when you look for a new one especially when you have advocated for yourself for and we have a good common Yeah, question Oh, What about ageism or I guess experienced ism I get the you have too much experience thing all the time and I'm still in my 30s Wow, I assume this is tied to budget and try to not take it personally. Oh, but yeah, do not take it personally. Yeah.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

How do you address that?

MJ :

When someone says that to you? Or

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

when Good luck to you when they say you have too much experience and is it that that's why they can't hire you potentially for some reason?

MJ :

Well, then you have to come prepared with that rebuttal. Like you know, that's typically what you're getting from people like that's their excuse to why then just come prepared saying, Okay, I have experience in this, but I'm looking to work, let's say Dyalekt you're looking to work at, you're used to large companies. Now you're applying for smaller companies, you're like, I'm trying to expand my experience in this company, or use something else besides your experience, because no one's experiencing everything, right. So you're used to one type of industry are used to one size of company. So yeah, I do have experience, but this experience was more so in this, I would like to broaden that experience by working in this type of company. And that that's true, right? Yeah. No one has all of it. So you have to find your gap or your opportunity of where your experience is and try to leverage that during the interview.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Hmm, I love that. Great. I'm curious being kind of on the like the insider part of HR, what do HR people mean when they say like, you have too much experience? What are they where are they coming from? What are they actually saying?

MJ :

Few things that could mean it could be one, they think you're too expensive, but they haven't had the conversation with you about what you're desired salary is? Or do they think you're going to get bored and quit on they think you've probably just going to take this job because you need a job. And then as soon as you find something that you're going to leave, so the two main ones, and and of course, there's other factors, right, you know, people just sometimes if you're working in a younger company or something like that, but for the main part when I'm thinking that I don't really say this to people, because I think that's horrible. But when I see someone's resume, and I'm like, Oh, I'm looking only for eight years experience, this person has like, 15 I don't even think they're gonna entertain me, like, they just probably are gonna be bored. I don't know if I can keep them for a sustainable amount of time. So typically, when people have such great experience, they want to be challenged, they want to be motivated. And when you have too much experience, they're worried you know, where they're going to leave me in one year, so and after the process all over again.

Dyalekt :

No, I really liked it. So like, basically from an HR perspective, you don't want to be a pity date.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Until they find something better, right?

Dyalekt :

No, no, no, no. That makes a lot of sense in that perspective. So like, if you are like, no, I really do need to be this, then you need to express that. I wanted to share talking about the HR thing, my invisible knapsack said, or only if you see certain people promoted. So like on the HR tip, when is it time to go to HR and be like, I feel like I'm not being treated well. And then how you even approach that? Because again, they're often working for the company, too.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Right? And it's very, like in the microaggressiony territory of you can explain that away, right? Yeah. How do you know that's something to address?

MJ :

So there's a couple of things to that kind of question. So the first thing I asked people when they do come to me to make a complaint or to vent or something about like a lack of raise or lack of respect in the company, or whatever it is, I asked them, have you addressed this problem with your manager first, like, usually I'm the last resort. Some people do feel comfortable speaking to HR so I always have to ask first because I want to know how deep you've got into advocating for yourself. So then they'll explain the situation to me what happened I try to get this raise and my coworker that's the same position as me. Got 20,000 I got five, you know, things like that. That's an obvious problem, right? But I do say to people, because obviously I do it for the company to work for the employees. I asked them like, what are you looking to get out of this? You know, because if I do fight for you, I have to use your name. And that comes a little bit unfortunately with a stigma because people then know that Pam came to me too, to seek help for this problem. And they'll know like, okay, Pam will go always go to HR Something happened, which could be good in a way because they know you're not playing around. But also you're you're attached with that saying, like, okay, like, we got to be careful around her. It just sucks but it's like a double edged sword. Then if someone just is looking for me to I guess just to vent or something like that can keep it confidential. But if you're looking for me to help, or HR to help, they're gonna have to say your name eventually.

Dyalekt :

I mean, I think that's good because I there's a lot of different situations and scenarios where like, maybe you shouldn't maybe so but like, I think just knowing that they're gonna have to put your name in the game if they're going to do anything official. So if you're not ready for it to get to that level, then maybe don't do it yet. Talk to a manager try to handle primary or do whatever kind of other thing I know. scenarios. Yeah, let's run the next song and then get to che-ches question. We're going to Montreal, Quebec. This artist has a really interesting style. All these artists are talking about knowing your worth, and some of them talking about specifically job stuff. So I'm going to talk more nebulously in the world. Cali Oaks here from Montreal, Quebec, talking about knowing your worth. And this is like a financial but also like in terms of capitalistic society. It's really layered stuff. So check that out. By the way, if you make any music, make indie music about personal finance and money stuff and we will play it on the podcast.

Song :

Cali Oaks. Yeah, know your worth. A lot of people they judge themselves by the impurities that you see. You got to realize that you want your space decorated with these impurities. And so you need to know your work you need to know that you have integrity Don't let anyone else tell you what your worth is. You're just taking the time to get to the bottom of things we go through because then as we come up with the tempo he has no he's looking at you that we're using a chicken is the cold truth people that stick in the back in the day that's what GMOs that we consider but no no no powder whole magic inside Atlanta civilization you without the spirit guys, giving the priests the benefit of the doubt to dependence. You wait spiritualities actually remembering your points in the body making the money on the fields we need a second funeral homeowner going on a killing spree I talked about how this belief placebo effect is proven scientifically and we'll test that we can agree that it's a sad case but an open the steady demand reactions to the rat race I don't see too many people complain about the service it's simple to live in a prison when you think you're worthless know you're throwing chicken because you know you're throw into the system know your work you went in there was a kid that wanted to create whatever the occupation take away art is the way to go if you want to Robin nation is all about cash living is marketable this population. So when did the tables turn? When did we say we ain't concerned explained from birth that we got to get up to pay for our planet that we sweat every day. Earn sign into paperwork which is accepted that they claim to turn in this option agreed that I'll know how you were seasick. What a really neat shit. As a minimalist, this shouldn't be so damn complicated. All the labor just falls away from accommodation. I'm not a political fighter. I just know what I'm worth. I know that people the fundamentals to secure Tom could save the church because Tom could lose his job if he not keeping it. Secure. Know your chicken pro Pro. That is on your shirt. You know your work is not about refusing to get stuff done. It's about about knowing your worth first. Then your steps Because you're gonna know that you deserve respect. But you got to know your worth. You deserve the freedom to have maximum optimism at all times. success comes from knowing that you deserve success in the first place.Know your worth.

Dyalekt :

From chichi some folks passed on my job application because my ask was too high. So what do we do? When we're seeing that happen? Like you're coming through and like, you've done the calculations and you're like, this is how much my stuff should be worth. And this is a reasonable ask, and you're seeing folks passing on it.

MJ :

You mean like it, she's applied through probably and she can write in or he can write in, to specify but like, You mean if you apply through like LinkedIn or something like that, and you put like I'm looking for 100,000. And then people continue to scroll by because it's too much, assuming that's what she means. All right,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

That goes with it too much experience conversation. Yeah. Like someone mentioned earlier, like too much experience equals, like, we can't afford you, probably, right.

MJ :

Mm hmm. So, there's a few things you can do, right? You don't have to put how much you're looking for. I suggest leaving it blank. If you can, if they force you to do it, try to look up what you think this position makes because it didn't make and look at the size of the company. Sometimes a smaller company not always, depending on the role, maybe the less money they'll pay, right? They don't have what a big company will have. So just do your research a little bit and just figure out what is medium between what you want and what they can offer. And then sometimes people will contact you that way. I know in the past, I've done that. I'm like, Oh, I'm looking to pay this person $55K but they're like Looking for $65K. But let me reach out to them and tell them my range and see if they will be interested because I like their experience. But not all people do that. So I would say leave it blank. And if they reach out to you and ask you say what you, you know you are looking for and ask them as well. Like, what is the budgeted salary for this position? Yeah, try to leave a blank just to give yourself more leeway to have more opportunities.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, and I get the thing about checking out the size of companies. I think a lot of companies seem bigger than they are, especially if they have like if they made a splash or something they did went viral. But that doesn't mean that like, you know, they don't have 20 employees and like, and only seven figures coming in and like they can barely swing all of that with that.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, yeah.

Dyalekt :

Shout out also real quick, from Daisy. Also, your manager may speak to HR about you and not tell you you don't speak for yourself and your side has never known. So there's another reason to possibly break things to HR like someone else might be doing that as well. I guess that feels messy, right?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

How do you address that part of it? Or is that? I don't know. I don't even know what the question is after that. I'm just like, what you do you do?

Dyalekt :

I guess it's what should you be worried about with all of that and what are we overblowing right now because we are not HR people?

MJ :

Say that part again?

Dyalekt :

Yeah. What should we actually be worried about in that situation? And like, what are we like overthinking? Because we're not HR folks who don't know.

MJ :

Yeah. So it depends, like how do you find out your, your manager went to HR about you, right? And the good thing is like, just like your manager can come to me about you, you can come to me by your manager. And that kind of stuff can be kept confidential between me and that person, just like the conversation with the manager and me. So if you have something say alvim you know, I most HR people write down notes right, they can keep like their own files about different complaints or issues or concerns So then when something does arise, I'm able to then do like a quick research or investigation and say, Okay, well, this person has made complaints over the last six months about their manager. And I know for a fact because they've come to me in private. Now I'm able to have proof that like, I know, maybe this individual is telling the truth, you know, because it unfortunately, it comes down to he said, she said, and it's whoever has evidence of what they're talking about.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Mm hmm. Gotcha. So sometimes it is still worth it to talk to HR.

MJ :

If you're okay with that confidential conversation.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

No, that's great. At least there's some kind of documentation, especially if you're worried about something coming back to you. Because it never has to go to your manager unless you. I love what you said earlier about, like, if you need me to help you, then I'm gonna have to say your name. But if you just need to, like talk about something and have me document it, like, everything's confidential.

Dyalekt :

You know, the stuff we were talking about, like documenting and putting things down, I've heard advice from other people saying, don't speak on the phone. Make sure that even if you do speak on the phone that you follow up with the emails that things are clear, is that like a golden rule? Or is there like some other stuff you should think about with that?

MJ :

Oh 100% believe in written communication after but when you write it sometimes people write with emotion, right? I'm sure we've all seen that before like, writing long long emails about nothing.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

guilty

MJ :

So, just just have the conversation first, and then follow up with the recap, like, you know, thank you for touching on all these points, blah, blah, blah, whatever it is, right? Just so you can have it as well. Or you can ask the HR person to also email you but um, I think written communication but something that is is something that you need in writing, like, okay, you promise me a raise on October 21. You said it and you told me this amount. Yeah, send it to your boss send it to whoever sent it to HR to prove that I just had this conversation with my manager. I was promised this amount blah, blah, blah. That's it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah. Okay, cool. So writing as much as possible, but keep it factual.

MJ :

Yeah, just factual stuff. So thing that you know, a lot of people forget or, um, you know, verbal conversations, especially has to do with money. So if they are making promises to you, then yeah, you asked for a follow up email, or you could create one to say, thank you for your time today. Can you please confirm the below points for October 21.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I love it. That's great.

Dyalekt :

We got a tough question here. Yeah, a blazing pig. Should employers be compensating for work from home expenses, utilities, Home Office, etc. If you're not being paid 1099's since they're not tax deductible on W2, yeah.

MJ :

So basically, if they're a freelancer, should they be paid, they're asking?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So if they're a freelancer, they'd be able to take the deduction, but if you're an employee who now has to work from home and you're using, like your utilities, you have a home office now, should your employer be compensating you for that? Since you can't deduct it?

MJ :

Should they? Yeah, probably, but will they is the question. So basically, they most people, most companies will not pay for like your extra use of utilities, but they might pay for your work equipment. And a lot of companies are doing that. And that's a fair thing to ask, you know, no one set up, especially in New York City, to have a home office, especially if you have roommates. You have a small studio, something like that. And now, if your company has officially decided that we're not going back for the rest of the year, then yes, some kind of reasonable accommodation is what it's called, is supposed to be made.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So like if you don't have a desk, for instance, because you you work in an office, you've never needed a desk before you can ask your company to buy you like a desk and a chair?

MJ :

You can ask, but depending on how tight the company is with money and what they want to do, you have to have a good reason for it. So just like with reasonable accommodations, you have to come prepare for what the reason is not just, oh, I'm working from home, I want a desk. It's like, I have no workspace and all I do for you is I you see my timecard I'm working nine hours a day on animation. Like I need a desk. Yeah. Like, make sure the case matches up with your workload.

Dyalekt :

Yeah. And I really like the term reasonable accommodation. Is that something where when I'm applying or when I first get a job, I could speak to HR and be like, hey, HR, do you have like parameters for reasonable accommodations for working from home?

MJ :

Yes, 100%. Reasonable accommodation is an HR term and it means that anything especially when it comes to physical and mental health, what you need to sufficiently do your job properly. So if the company is saying that we do you have work from home program and you have to work from home then there has to be some type of reasonable accommodation. If they have a work from home program where like you can choose to, but you still have the office, you're less likely to get everything you need.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, got it

MJ :

just reasonable means reasonable for you and the company. But for example, if you have a back problem, and you need a special kind of chair, they have to give it to you. If you just show a doctor's note.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, okay, so reasonable accommodation plus, like any, like medical issues or things like that the company has to

MJ :

medical, mental physical.

Dyalekt :

Okay, so that makes sense. So reasonable accommodation is the thing that allows you to do your work, whether it is simple efficiency here having a thing or whether it's something that is compensating for a physical or other sort of disability.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, that makes sense. Yeah. Oh, my God, I can't believe the hours almost over.

Dyalekt :

I'm still like, man, I want to ask everybody who's giving me a job. What are your reasonable accomodations? Hey, if you're on a job interview, and you know that you have any questions for me question, if you're really bad at that you never know what to say, there you go.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

What are your reasonable acommendations. I love it.

MJ :

I had somoene who was applying, and this is like years ago, he's legally blind. He told me during the interview, and he's like, I would just need like a reasonable accommodation, which would be a bigger monitor or something like that. So it happens and It's okay, if you're interviewing with HR to tell them beforehand or on during the onboarding process.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

That's awesome. Even just knowing that phrase makes me feel more empowered too.

Dyalekt :

I think a lot of people with like sighted but legally blind might not even apply for that position, because they're like, Oh, I'm going to be asking so much of them. You know, if someone has a resume close to mine, they're going to take them over me because I'm going to be asking for too much. Yeah, but it is a reasonable accommodation, and that is a defining term within the place you're gonna work.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I'm pretty sure I've dealt with some unreasonable accommodations.

MJ :

Yeah, right.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

For real? Oh, man. So I want to ask because we're running out of time. We're in this weird COVID time right now, we don't know what the new normal is. I feel like this still isn't even the normal, like, how do employees have to change their approach during this time?

Dyalekt :

keeping your feet on the ground, and your eyes on the target? Yeah,

MJ :

yeah. What's gain in terms of?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, waiting effort now versus pre COVID. In terms of like, your leverage as an employee? And it was a messy question.

MJ :

Yeah, I was gonna say this. Oh, my gosh, I feel like that's a whole other hour. So I think the world and you know, especially the way the US works with jobs, I guess, let's try to narrow down to at least professional careers, that just means people who go to an office, right, yeah. So I think we're still figuring that out to see what's going to happen. But I think what you need to do is like, like I said, leverage your skill set in the company if you know you're not going anywhere right now, right? So find a way to implement yourself more than usual take more initiative than you would ever take before be way more proactive, just because like, unfortunately, some companies are cutting people because they're just trying to protect other people, or they have to do because they really have no money to pay you in payroll, right. So like, the more valuable you make yourself as an employee who is employed right now the way better you'll be. So don't just sit around like sitting on your hands and letting things happen. I think this just go out there and see what you can do that's outside of the norm of your job. You know, like I said, if you are a financial analyst, like create something that will benefit the company, I don't know a spreadsheet or something that shows a company how to save money that they didn't think of before because that's really why companies hire people like like us, right back of house people HR finance, like you're there to advise the company. Fine. You know, I feel like everyone should take that approach for now. You See yourself as an advice to the company, no matter what industry you're in, and make yourself valuable.

Dyalekt :

I love that. I love that. We'll talk about the entrepreneurial spirit when working for other people. It's that exact thing. And that's what I was having in my head as you were bubbling. And then you came to that conclusion like, yes, that's what's up. Also another really hard question here, but this is great. From Kaz, how do you deal with a boss who does not respect your time?

MJ :

I think go to HR, if you can already. See what their policies on work life balances, see what their business hours are and kind of like start to jot down for yourself like how often they're not respecting your time. If you're in like, a serious like, okay, let's say you're renewing, you're someone who has to like completely renew the benefits for the whole company. That is a lot of work. And that takes a few weeks and it's over. But this is something that's been happening consistently now for like over everything, like every single project, every single assignment, like take note about that. So then you can come correct to whoever you want to tell to like HR, like someone higher than your manager. So you can say, you know, over the last few months, I've been working 65 hours, which is more than my usual of 40 hours, I'm getting paid for it, especially if you got a pay cut, right? And like, I'm happy to be, you know, just like throw it all together. So you can say that I feel like I need to get a better work life balance. How can we figure this out together?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I love that phrasing too. Because it's like, yes, like, fundamentally your advantage is not respecting your time. But this goes back to like the reasonable accommodations thing of like, hey, like, I need for my mental health to have a work life balance. I can't be working 65 hours a week that's not reasonable.

Dyalekt :

And use their language. Right. So hold them to it. Yeah. Hold on to it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, I think I'm, I just want to reiterate the thing that you said before, too, because it's come up several times. In just your responses to people, the need for women in particular and probably POC to be more accurate, right, like to document everything to think about having to build your case, even though you know what's happening, like, how can you build your case, so that you can actually like talk to your manager. And if you have to actually talk to HR,

MJ :

Exactly like you just what I want people to understand, especially poc, and women is just like, I'm not saying the document your whole life or anything like that, but you want to take the emotion out the complaint because a complaint already has emotional to people. So just make sure you're jotting down facts. So you can state the facts and there's no like gets, they can't say Oh, she's just mad or she's just emotional or, or he or you know what I mean? Like just try to do your best to write the facts down. So then you can present your case to HR or your manager to say, I've accepted this for for this amount of time. These are the things that I'm doing and I need to be compensated I need my work life balance back something

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I love that. I love that take the emotion out of the complaint. man yeah, somebody tweet that.

Dyalekt :

well cause you make them a emotional? Let them get emotional while you got the numbers and your cool as a cucmber and you got your numbers.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah cuz well they may already think of POC and women as emotional right? Yeah. So how do we make sure that we protect ourselves and share the facts and still get what we need to do the shop?

Unknown Speaker :

Exactly.

Dyalekt :

I know we're gonna get the timer honest before so we Oh, it just came out. There it is. Oh, where can we find? How can people hire you?

MJ :

Oh yeah. So you can go to advisory ave on Instagram or advisoryave.com and you can literally hit me up however you need. Do free consultations to see what the need is.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh my gosh, thank you so much for joining us MJ, I'm just adding your Instagram

Dyalekt :

Thank you so much you answered so many very difficult questions. Thank you audience for coming with the heat as always like it's okay if you're like, Oh, no. Like you really had some great stuff and I'm hopefully keeping up with your level of dropping knowledge. Our last song comes back home to America, Oakland, California. I love this name. My favorite names I've heard in a while Voltaire Slapadelik. With a last song called Know Your Worth with a lot of really great information about knowing your worth and how people feel about it. Allow the artists to be emotional when we get our numbers together and do our thing. Big shout out to advisor Ave. Thank you so much MJ and we'll check you out next time with budget budget.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Bye, everybody.

Song :

Want you to be grateful for minimum wage when you go go work with a grin on your face while customers cost you about spitting complain you won't need the bullshit and barely sustainable they laugh and show down all their pipes overlays. Imagine if nobody showed up today. Tell them the boss says you no longer play the place was shut down and they lose all their sway because you got the power. You got to say you're the economy more than the state it's all on your hands you would throw it away. All you need is the welder be great and it will be too late for these villainous snakes break in your back to put food on the table but I don't know nice would not do you no favors. They still get banned off the food or your labor. You pay the taxes they get the paper you're down in the basement they lounge on vacation and they will not change it not now but not later. overnight. Y'all see how much is at stake here this track a note about me much more at play here isn't a game nothing major I'm raising the issues the best I can say them. No, you're the man but you know, y'all know y'all know y'all know y'all know y'all. Raise your hands. Raise your hands. Raise your hands. Know your work. Raise your hands. I know y'all know y'all Raise your hands. Raise your hands. Raise your hands. Raise your hands. catching Miyata, no picket lines. telling these costs we won't get in line margin downtime with our VISTA by stopping all traffic at peak our business time because every day by the surveys for lazy blank lines and they take them away they hear that they matter just makes them enraged imagine it happened to York in one day gone through some dead because he had a bad day goes on the news or slander of his name goes on vacation and still getting paid for tires one day you received for rain maybe it's the national game what's been said maybe your blood goes on boiling lead maybe you won't want to stand for the pledge maybe you're no longer justify death that's just my guess I could be wrong your rights might not matter as much as the song is easy to shut up and follow along was harder to speak out and say yeah, my stop measure our worth by that day's been non stop treating our worst klieman de Graaff empowering those who gave cheating assault until we rise up with the most resolve racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals. Criminals are criminals. know y'all know y'all Ma'am, let y'all know y'all know y'all. Raise your hands. Raise your hands. Raise your hands, though y'all work. Raise your hands the movie y'all know y'all know y'all know y'all want to raise your hands. Raise your hands. Raise your hands. I know y'all\ know your work.