Brunch & Budget

b&b239: You CAN Knock the Hustle

February 02, 2021 Brunch & Budget
Brunch & Budget
b&b239: You CAN Knock the Hustle
Show Notes Transcript

We don't know about you, but we're tired of hearing out of touch celebrity millionaires (looking at you, Diddy) who keep telling us we should have been hustling even harder in the middle of a global pandemic. We are TIRED! But more importantly, hustle culture prevents us from interrogating the system of oppression it was built upon. Instead of advocating for our own labor/worker rights, we're pitted against each other. Instead of giving ourselves space to rest and recharge, we feel forced to work until burnout.

Hustle does not equal abundance. Hustle only leads to more hustle.

By the end of this podcast, you'll know how to knock the hustle and still have enough money to create a balanced financial life.

Music Featured in This Episode:

Struggle Not To Hustle by 13thmark
Can't Stop the Hustlin' by  JahYut
The Tortoise Hustle by Sankofa

Dyalekt:

When your wallet is tired of pushing boulders up a hill and you're looking over your shoulder because creditors have no chill and they're lying to you on social you're just looking for something fail fix your face and play the top money over a meal. This is the budget budget podcast your Certified Financial Planner accredited financial counselor here to take a bite out of your budget. Sounds like usual. podcast

Unknown:

everybody, fancy, fancy, fancy. To make it cheaper,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

cheaper and cheaper. It is also the only quote that still fits me after having a baby.

Dyalekt:

The theme of today's episode, what we've been dealing with like this whole month is the idea that actually sorry, Jay, you can not know where the hustle comes from and what the hustle is being done to you folks act like hustle only means one thing, like it only means hard work. and hard work is only something that gets you places when remember that the hustle was a dance. The hustle is a drug deal. The hustle is a con. But hustle is also hard work that other people have to do so they can pat on the back of you. So let's get into talking about all the things get into talking about the customer and hustle culture and how it works out

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

and how it does. Well. And this really came from I think it was Diddy, who who the last thing you said in 2020 was if you didn't hustle hard enough this year, you just don't have it in you or some shit like that.

Dyalekt:

Yeah,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

excuse me. We're living in a global pandemic. We're all traumatized by a horrible presidency. like can we all chill please?

Dyalekt:

Well, no, we can't. That's the thing is this is that 48 Laws of Power type of stuff that comes from talking about that I don't really agree with where they got it. Like everything is a fight. Everything is a fistfight. Everything is a crime. It's a it's all a tournament and we're all battling for dominance and killing each other. And you know, fluffy, who killed most folks that he worked with or incarcerated? You know?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Yes, he's the embodiment of the hustle. Yeah. Well, let's talk about the history of hustle and the word of in general.

Dyalekt:

Yeah, yeah. Hustle itself comes from what's it is is a Dutch I believe? Oh, yes. Yes. It's

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

a Dutch word hustle in, yes, there's this great

Unknown:

Muslim.

Dyalekt:

Muslim, what it means to shake. Okay. And the thing about it, what's really interesting about other words started out is it was primarily used in black American communities. Even when we were digging through the origins of the word, the places that were like race neutral about it, they only listed black owned newspapers, you know, it's like the Chicago Defender and things like that things that were in black communities. So the hustle and and the associated term side hustle. These are terms that grew independently of each other, but also kind of meaning both doing legitimate work that was difficult and got you places and also creating a con or a lie that would trick people into letting you get into the space because you wanted to get into

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Hey, that's a lot of contradicting. First of all, like

Dyalekt:

newspapers in the 1930s, the same issue having different articles about hustling, being a con or hustling, being just busting your behind, oh my god. So

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

what is it, which is it? And that's I mean, that's the thing too, is, you know, hustle culture. First of all, I hate that it's called hustle culture, but whatever. But the history of the word hustle really came about for more origins of the word meaning to hurry or to obtain by begging in this country to gumption and hard work, and then did transition into the illegal activities that were referencing dialect, sex, work drugs, and then it turned into connecting the lack of hustle to black people and laziness. That was the evolution of it. And the idea that black people are struggling to their due to their own failures, rather than systemic oppression became really widespread.

Dyalekt:

It's funny because we still use the term hustle a lot, but also a burgeoning word that has a lot of the same meanings and same origins but comes from the American South is the trap. You know, that's an old Southern term like, you know, the hustle thing like it by the way, we're talking about the 1930s Yeah, hustle came out and was used in black communities and then the 1950s when we're talking about side hustles, and when people talk about the trap that's that was that was just 10 years ago, like Trap Music came out, like oh, trap is my culture. But boats been trapping for decades, and trapping men sex drive work, it meant the activity that you could get into where there weren't eyes on you. You could maybe slide

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

definitely doesn't sound like a good

Dyalekt:

well, it's not. This is the thing, even if it ends up benefiting you in the short term. It's not a good room for you or your family in the long run.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Right? Well, and the thing about the hustle is in the 90s and 2000s a lot of black rappers actually started folding the idea of the hustle into their lives and hustling internally. As a direct response to having to hustle and you know, being able to provide for your family. Yeah,

Dyalekt:

I mean, it's something that's too regularly curated by labels who were emphasizing drug dealer rappers over other types of rappers. And this is like how things enter white consciousness. That's really ill because for the most part, rappers who were talking about, I'm a hustler in the 90s, they were talking about, I'm doing illegal activity, um, nine times out of 10 was something drug related, but they're talking about a hustler. And there were many times where they were like, lament over the hustler and and you know, I don't like that I have to do it and all this stuff. But it was about doing illegal activity was mainly about drug dealing, because that's the beginning of black males that they wanted to have out there, right. And guess what, white folks were consuming this a lot, right? And for white folks to be able to forgive themselves for listening to a bunch of black drug dealers and idolizing empathizing, whatever you want to call it, that is as to what it really is the thing about it for them to forgive themselves, they had to make it a metaphor. So it was no longer about Oh, the song where j and m rap about how they work really hard at selling drugs to people is hustling they cut out in their minds, the selling drugs.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

The work really hard part is the part that matters. And also they cut out the whole reason they have to sell drugs because of systemic oppression in mind, right?

Dyalekt:

They cut out all of that too. I was shouting out like, you know, Jenny's like one of the guys who like does a lot of really detailed explanation of that. And it's not like they haven't made those metaphors as well. I remember the line right before I'm not a businessman, I'm a businessman is I so kilos of coke, I'm guessing I can sell CDs, like, you know, like, I've got translatable skills, right? That's a positive thing. I can see rappers being like, hey, I want to let you know, I had to do what I had to do. But I develop translatable skills that are important, right? I get all of that. Yet still, the artists who are making these things, the people who are consuming these things, and the ideas are built on the backs of this. They're all being exploited. Yeah, we're all being exploited we

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

are. And we see that now. Last week, we talked about prop 22 was the proposition that was passed in California to actually exempt all the delivery people all of the rideshare people from being classified as employees. So all the Uber Lyft, doordash Postmates, all those folks are now in California stuck in this independent contractor world, right. And the gig economy in general really proliferated because of this idea of like, you can be your own boss, you can work for yourself, you can have your own hours, you can make this extra money on the side, and really hustle. I mean, one of the things that really when we saw corporations co Ops, the word hustle was where is this quote? It's like so wild. It was from Oh, the former Uber CEO Travis Callen ik introduced a set of values that included always be hustling get more done with less working harder and longer and smarter, not just two of the three which again, further contradiction, right? get more done with less, but also work longer, harder and smarter. Well, and

Dyalekt:

also the anti blackness all sorts of present in that who's rapper talking about always be hustlin? Did your mama or did you learn that from black homes? Always be hustling?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Yeah, like now more than ever, especially with, with this pandemic, really exposing a lot of the, I don't know, a lot of the bullshit that we're dealing with in this system that the hustle now more than ever feels tone deaf at best. And at most, it feels like it's meant to just keep us where we are. Yeah,

Dyalekt:

I mean, growing up is the most generous description you can give of it. Now, it's really a subtle motivation to make a shame ourselves into doing work for other people. That's the whole thing about it. Like, the hustle can be productive for you sometimes, but it's not long term overall. We'll talk about psychology that in a second, but check it out. When you're living in a world where it's about CEOs who live for the quarter, if all they gotta do is run you into the ground to burnout.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

They're good money, right? They get to go into years and still have millions of dollars. I mean, okay, dialect is the hustle ever good.

Dyalekt:

Oh, yeah. In the short term, right. Hey, you got a, you know, I talked about this on the last episode, or one of the other episodes, you know, I was in a situation where I needed to pay back rent, because it's something that wasn't even my fault, but like a bunch of money saved up and I was about to be homeless. Okay, I took all the 12 hour shifts, and, and I did side gigs and things for friends and stuff like that. And it was like a defined amount of time. And I was bored out when I was done, but it did feel good to be able to get myself out of a bad situation. Yeah, so yeah, okay, short term. Hustle can be a good. Okay,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

I feel that I feel that

Dyalekt:

but that's when you have control over what's going on.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Ah, okay. And would you even call it a hustle? Do you mean to Travis? Yes. I'm

Dyalekt:

just making sure

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

he was not he was not Oh, wow. No, he's definitely the whitest white guy ever. You know,

Dyalekt:

the whitest white guy, but he looks like this. So y'all know he looks like Patrick Duffy.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Oh my god. Merci beaucoup. Two years later was of course Me too. Pretty hard. Oh,

Dyalekt:

he was awful. Oh, then my bad. But yeah, let me not even put him in the same categories.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Yeah, the thing about hustling is that it's not a choice for a lot of people.

Dyalekt:

Yeah. Well, I mean, when I was doing the research for the songs that we're gonna be playing today, most of them when we talk about the hustles, like a half a hustler can't stop hustling, right? Whether it's an internal compulsion, or whether it's by external force, and oftentimes by external force, but we rationalize it by internal complexity

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

and what he even just what you described where you had to hustle, because you were in a dire situation, right? It's not that you wanted to hustle. It's that you had to do it to get by.

Dyalekt:

Yeah, I mean, which, like I can completely understand, because there's been many times when I've told my wife, no, I want to rub your feet. I just know that's like, that's what I was planning. I put that into my into my daily planner. I'm saying I'm trying to teach my daughter your relationship.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

It's true. So this NPR article really won't. We'll link to it in the show notes because it really talks about the history of where each one Yeah, yeah, there's also a quote, a great book, Lester case spent knocking the hustle against the neoliberal turn and black politics. And this is where this is where he really talked about the black rappers explicitly exalting the daily rise and grind mentality of black men, what they needed to possess in order to survive and to thrive.

Dyalekt:

Good. I throw this in, because I know you're saying black rappers partially because it's the thing that it says in the article, and it has a lot to do with black stuff. But the thing that I think is very funny, being an indie rapper for the past 20 years is white rappers didn't talk about these things, but only in certain situations. And I'm not saying only like, there were never any variations, but like I most likely was eating I was when a white rapper felt a need to share their credibility as a fellow poor person, fellow foot upon person, fellow first person, they put a lot of stuff in their grind in there. Ha, gotcha. But that wasn't necessarily something they had to talk about. But it was something like I know I Mmm, I had that one song was like spending your whole paycheck and his sneakers, am I talking to the whole thing about how they built their world? Right? Well, credibility builder rather than just regular necessity.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Got you. You think that, um, the glorification of it has really led to this acceptance of the gig economy, right? And when we look at this idea of like, being an independent contractor versus employee, how many of us didn't even know that that was a thing, right? How many of us didn't have to know the independent contractor was a thing?

Dyalekt:

You know? So I'm gonna throw something to you have to know how to do our taxes. Well, while you're talking about rappers and stuff, right, you know, who knew this artists, artists,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

artists always knew this in the artists

Dyalekt:

in the freelancers, people who've been doing their own thing for a minute now who like many times have been on the creative side, we are contractors, rather than actual employees in many different mediums where we got some sort of loyalty to a label or distributor or some sort of entity. They don't have much to us, and they don't handle our day to day, we're the ones taking care of our promo. We're the ones doing our scheduling. And yet, we have to do that. And that's the thing is they have access and will tell us if you don't do the hustle part. Well, we'll just reach out to someone else who will. Yeah, that's real.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

So there's always another artists, right. Yeah, there's always another driver. There's always another delivery person, and there's always another person willing to work instead of you. Yep. That was the whole point

Dyalekt:

of hustle culture. Just like the exploitation model with practice on black Americans. The hustle culture gig economy model was practice on creatives in decades, and once they perfected it, brought it to the mainstream.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

And that's real. Now speaking of artists.

Dyalekt:

Yeah, the relative was good was good. Our first song I know it's getting it's getting to be a lot. So we're talking about songs here with artists who have examples of what the hustle feels like. And first, we're starting off with this cat named birthmark, and birthmark with my phone from Greensboro, North Carolina with the song I was talking about the definition of hustling having to do with drug dealing, and this song is struggle not to hustle, and we're gonna jam on the side in a minute and we'll be back in three minutes.

Unknown:

I know my dad Nick is filming

Dyalekt:

every day.

Unknown:

Every day is a struggle. It's a struggle not to hustle every day. It's a struggle. It's a struggle not focused on paper chasing. wake up every morning Hello, it's just my mind niggas hustling. Pointing fingers around me for the way that I tried to achieve resistant bugs in my family tree. Slash a pill. My most fucked up when we play like no matter how cool niggas dance it's a struggle not the hustle it's a struggle not the hustle gotta get you gotta struggle not the hustle. But can miss a stroke or not the hustle every day Nick is struggling to hustle gotta get a stroke or not to hustle for your stroke or not the hustle is chasing me down baby mama trooper for my daughter gotta be like the world on my shoulders breaking my neck and my mistakes just dealing with him. Well, my dad began on the streets karate Mecca poetry behind these pieces, but it takes money to make money. got money laying low from the block cuz these niggas tried to snitch on me. What's up, homie? Remember that we used to be cool that you trooper when it gets the first rule. Don't snitch. cases, okay. Don't get caught up in the mix. It's a struggle, not to hustle. Gotta get it. It's a struggle not to hustle every day is a struggle. Not the hustle. is a struggle, not the hustle every day, nigga. His struggle, not the hustle. gotta kill it, nigga. It's a struggle. Not the hustle for you seen a struggle, not the hustle.

Dyalekt:

The hustle. And we are back. A bunch of other podcast that was struggling not to hustle my birth. I wanted to shout out. There's this one thing? Yeah, well, it was. The album is called diary on tape. And I really dig how much of a diary it is. It was very honest and didn't seem to braggadocious was like one of the reasons why I wanted to play it because of how much he got into himself and one of the lines a hustler slash pimp Bob blood, having a heart once had my emotions stocked up. But one of the ill things when we were doing our research about the hustle culture and the struggle of the hustle is it had a lot to do with emotions that how you felt about dance. You know, they tell us that you work for what you love. It never feels like work. But is that really true? That project that is your heart? That idea that you want to leave behind after you die the thing that's gonna build a legacy for your family and all that. Is that easy. Does that not feel like work? But does it stress you out more?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Just think about more difficult sleep and dream about it. Right? Do you think about it every waking moment because you can't turn it off? Right?

Dyalekt:

That's the stuff that matters to you. That's reality.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Oh, man, I hate that. hate that. hate that people say that. Oh, man.

Dyalekt:

Well, thank you for birthmark. I don't know it's Carolina for being real about it. Yeah,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

exactly. Exactly. I

Unknown:

love it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

I love it.

Dyalekt:

Okay, so yeah, that's it brought up.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

I was gonna ask because I know you found some fun parts about the hustle. thing I will say the thing about the hustle that is appealing to a lot of us, myself included is it makes you feel like you have control. Right? It makes you feel like that you can change your situation based on you just working hard enough, doing more going longer, thinking smarter, whatever it is, like, it makes you feel like that you can change what's going on in your life. And it makes you feel like you can change it makes you feel like you can change your current situation and do something better do something that you feel more is more valuable. So

Dyalekt:

it's like it's like a workout or fistfight or some drugs. Just gives you some dominance. Okay, yeah. And endorphins, I

Unknown:

guess. Yeah.

Dyalekt:

So I'm gonna share, we're gonna share the screen with this one. And it's funny. I messed up because I should have shared it before I even clicked on it. Because at first when I clicked it said, Do you want to make more money from your blog? And I had to click No, I don't want to make money. Allow me to go to the page. Rather, like I just poked myself. Oh, no, I don't want to make more money. Anyway, so here's a couple of quotes. I want to run through a couple of these and talking about how they feel so good things happen to those who hustle by a nice men. Okay, and that's right. I guess that's been good things happen to those who wait. It's like flip it on that way. Be proactive and go and do things and like, I guess so. But that also sounds like something that your boss would tell you when you seem like you're not doing enough. The fruit of your own hard work is the sweetest, the sweetest Everything from the blacker one but Okay, this one being about loving the effort, rather than loving the outcome, which is one of these things I love to be like, I don't want to hand out or you shouldn't want to handle I want to earn this. Or that because it's gonna feel so much better when I earn it. And mind you, there's nothing wrong with earning stuff, building things, yourself creating things. But the real I don't know if you've ever just been given a thing, but that's cool, too. And

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

yeah, I love it when someone else makes a salad. For me.

Dyalekt:

The reason that this is empowering the folks or feels empowering to folks is because it's another rationalization my parents, probably your parents, they were brought up to believe that hustling and hard work and doing things yourself is beautiful and wonderful because they were forced to Yeah, they had no other recourse. If all you done, your life is fight, then you're going to love fight. And you're going to extol the virtues of fighting. And you're going to tell people that the only way to get stuff is spiking and other things a bit because you have an experience

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

and the results that they receive from that they're going to directly correlate the two right it's because I fought my whole life for this.

Dyalekt:

And here's one that from a word people I think the word people find this fun greatness only comes before hustle in the dictionary.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

It's a winning one, right?

Unknown:

For your for your, for the

Dyalekt:

hustle in the dictionary. Because you know, one thing about that though, is I don't know if you've spent the last four years in America, but I think we've proven that wrong.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

And to go there.

Dyalekt:

We just had a president who spent his entire life bragging about stuff rather than doing stuff.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

There's a lot of reading about not having to do much.

Unknown:

And also bragging about not having to do

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

the most anti hustle.

Dyalekt:

In fact, you know, for the most part, the thing that I found is that greatness often comes before us even jobs, we have to work really hard. You got to prove to them that you're great before they even give you the opportunity to

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

sell real that's so true.

Dyalekt:

has come before I mean, it's everything we say about like artists and record labels is they only want us once they don't need us once we don't need them, excuse me. And then they don't need us. Yeah, you must either modify your dreams are magnified your skills, you have to get better or else you have to settle for less. Because it's always an either or right if you don't get the thing that you said you were gonna get, then you're a failure and you suck and you're gonna die,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

right? Well, one it also assumes that your dreams are either too big or too small, right? And that the work that you're doing is never going to get to it.

Dyalekt:

The big thing is not about smaller, big dreams. The big thing is about the dreams being scarce. Hello, if you don't do enough stuff, someone is gonna take your dream like that's how dreams work. I love this one. If it comes easy, it will go fast. That's because you know, easy come easy go wasn't good enough was a lot about our level of appreciation and how much they want us to sit down and be humble. And that's a great song by Kendrick but you saw all the stuff you had to do and all the praise Kendrick got well tell him folks to sit down and be humble. That is a privilege that you got to get through. It's something you can earn. But I'm saying though, here this is really really fun. The key to success is to start before you are ready because people don't care about you hurting yourself

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

is actually not Marie Forleo y'all are the Ogun she's the B school ladies.

Unknown:

Oh yeah.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

1000 to $3,000 go through my course and create a website looks just like everyone else's website.

Dyalekt:

I wasn't sure I was like the names you know, after like a rainbow four. So like, this is the real thing of it. Like one it's never the key to success to start before you're ready. And to the times that we start before we're ready are because we are ready in one sense, but not ready not trying to be slick with where it's like, oh, we're mentally ready, but not physically ready. Yet, we just need to jump. We don't just need to jump we're gonna do just like this, like one or two more before we get out of here. Thanks for indulging me on these because we just got to go through the ways that we talked about this. This is one that really makes me who's the one who wrote this this blog. I don't usually say this kind of stuff. But NFL see No, fuck you. You're an asshole and idiot can't stand you. I find it the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have noted, slave owner, Thomas Jefferson, slave servants. With that, the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have a person who had some people living in his house making his meals out of here. And then the last one, believe you with those at the top of the mountain didn't fall there. There really shouldn't be that they were carried. They're flown in there. Yeah, the real of that stuff is we have this idea that just because we see somebody with a lot, that they are successful, and that their success was something that was built rather than something that came pre formed. This is the harmful ideas that we have about the hustle and about what's possible when we work for us. Yeah, I think you know, the hustle is really hard for people who work for other folks. But for the self employed it's the wild. Yeah, I

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

think That's a thing and I want to share this quote. So the problem is that hustling isn't a choice where people are at the top, there's a world of difference between staying late at the office for promotion and peeing in a bottle to keep your job at the Amazon warehouse. Trust me, that came from Tracy McMillan cotton, who wrote for Time Magazine, everyone is hustling but everyone cannot hustle the same. And I think that's really what all of this comes down to is that the people who have to hustle don't have the choice, right? They don't have the glamorous job, they don't have the ability to just say like, no, I actually am not going to do this extra thing, I'm actually not going to make this exercise. Because they needed to to pay the bills. That's really what it comes down to at the end of the day. One thing that we realize right now is that the hustle, focus on revenue, the focus on being your own boss, the focus on being competitive, working harder and longer than someone else. All of these things are not only forcing you to produce, they're also force you to consume hustle culture also tells you, you don't need to save money, you need to give all of the things that you want. In fact, you should get all of the things that you want. And all you have to do is work harder to get all of it right.

Dyalekt:

Yeah. And that's the kind of thing I remember knowing a lot of bartenders who would make a ton of money. And they also respected and liked other bartenders. So they will blow most of that money that they made, go into other bars and tipping the other bartenders because I love them and respect them, we are put into this place where mind you within our own community, it feels good. Because we support each other, we hold each other down and give each other opportunities, but the same couple of dollars keep circulating in the same way.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

That's the thing about it, right. And the thing I've been thinking about this more and more, because also, most people are in the hustle who are hustling, as we've seen with these gig economy jobs rising is they're independent contractors. And what that means is you're responsible for your own payroll taxes, you're responsible for tracking your expenses, you're responsible for filing more complicated tax returns, you're responsible for getting your own health insurance, you're responsible for your own retirement plan, right. And the thing that I realized is the hustle is just we used to call the rat race, except you don't get a 401 K, like, this is ridiculous. It's all the same thing. The hustle is not getting you out of anything to hustle just put you into a whole different thing and put you into the same shit anyway. Except that corporations are even less responsible for you as a worker. That's what this all comes down to.

Dyalekt:

Yeah, it's actually about laziness, after all. Yep. When our laziness is in a later segment, I want to talk a little bit more about like our laziness and stuff. But it's about the laziness, the moral failing type of laziness of corporations, of companies, I guess, individuals who want to run companies who don't want to do the work, right, who don't want to do the hard part of running a business. We have what between us What is it three businesses? Yeah. And what's the hard part of running a business? It's not even breastfeeding.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

the easy part?

Dyalekt:

That's easy. What's the hard part of running a business

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

is not being able to stop.

Dyalekt:

Right? And what I would say it's because of all the little things right,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

oh, yes, we have to do literally everything,

Dyalekt:

sending the invoices,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

the invoices, emailing people back and forth. Remember when making sure you get paid. Remember when I'm sending out to other people who you had to hire under you, because you didn't have time to do all the work you're

Dyalekt:

supposed to do? The demands are one thing. But remember the hours and hours and days and days and sometimes we go looking up a good health insurance plan. Making sure that their benefits worked out. brainpower it takes people power, it takes time and money, money, more money that even looks like on the balance sheet. Oh my God, that's what cats are want to do. Right? Exactly. Yeah.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Because if you want to pay someone 50 $60,000 a year, it's gonna cost you as a business 70 or $80,000 a year.

Unknown:

Can you read the numbers real quick? Yeah, how does that work? Um, so

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

if you hire someone, this is why Uber and Lyft and Postmates and doordash don't want to hire their workers as employees, they want to glorify the be your own boss have flexible hours, all that bullshit is because you're paying payroll taxes, which is 7.65% of all of the income that someone makes, you're paying for health insurance benefits, which is at least $500. A worker, if you want to offer all the benefits for health insurance, you're paying for a retirement plan. And if you're a good employer, you're probably doing a match because you're not offering pension anymore Like we used to in the past. You're also paying for continuing education, you're paying for any of their work expenses. You're paying for any new equipment that they have to do if you if you require them to have a uniform. You

Dyalekt:

remember when you went to that conference that costs like $400 a person that's your employer paying for those?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Yeah, yeah, exactly. And now that you're an independent contractor and your own boss, your employer is not obligated to do any

Dyalekt:

of that. freedom to do it all yourself. This reminds me talking about rappers since we started the beginning of the year, in the early 2000s. When the internet was starting to give us the ability to talk to each other. There was this thing where rappers were like, well, I could just be independent. So record labels started getting rappers you might remember this their own mini labels that was subsidiaries label, right? You know, it started out a label. So the benefit of that the benefit was you had the access and the resources, the resources and some of their capital. But the day to day management stuff was on you, and you had to hire staff and you had to hire a team. That's why you would see a rapper with like a one hit wonder cat who like, you know, restaurants, they would build a team of folks from their neighborhood, because again, people aren't lazy. People aren't selfish, they give their community jobs, but it's the people. It's the only so that may or may not work out for them. And they didn't have a plan to start a business. They had a plan to get signed. It was this interesting sidestep that leaders were able to like advocate responsibility and still retain some level of ownership over these artists.

Unknown:

It's true.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Oh, this baby, oh, my goodness. Okay. So how do you get all of this? This is a lot. This is a whole culture. Right. And this is something that the wildest thing about this to me is that this whole idea of the corporatization of the hustle only happened in the last 10 years, it only happened with the gig economy and the Ubers and the lifts. And this rejection of being an employee and working for someone else or working for the man turned into you had to become the man and the man secretary and demand accountant and the feds bookkeeper.

Dyalekt:

I mean, this was popularized in the 90s by black artists who gave it to a mostly white audience, you know, 30 years later, I've internalized that themselves. When we talk about black oppression on the brunch and budget, podcast and racing wealth in general, if you are not black, this still pertains to you because everything they do to us, they will do to you, no matter what your background is. It's that old home about they didn't come for us and now and now they got me.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

They came for us. They really did. They really frickin did. So how do we fight this? Right? Because the thing about muscle culture that was so appealing to people was that felt sexy. It felt like Oh, be my own boss making my own schedule. I could take a vacation whenever I want. I could

Dyalekt:

be like, it'll be a picture of somebody on a beach looking relaxing, like the feeling good. Another test. Like what I did was grinding for hours. I did all these burpees and I studied classes and I loved doing all this, you know,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

yeah. And there's this. There's this idea that like working, working, working, having a side hustle is sexy, but having savings isn't sexy. You're not supposed to say you're supposed to hustle, right? You're not supposed to

Dyalekt:

your money got to work for you. Right? Your savings. It's not working. It's not hustling.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

It's not you're just sitting in savings.

Dyalekt:

Remember that hustling? And it's a dance you got to do.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Damn, yeah. So how do we find the hustle through personal finance. And I think that there are two, two main ways to do this. And they're gonna be a little boring, because Because really, and truly nothing sexier than the hustle. Nothing is sexier than this idea that you are always grinding and that you're always beating someone. That's the thing about the hustle is you're always winning something you're always you're always in competition with someone and the goal is to, you know, be better than them and to do more than them and to work harder than them. So the boring thing in terms of combating this new person

Dyalekt:

for scraps is the boring part. No, no, no, no.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

I mentioned earlier to combat the hustle. The personal finance is one prioritizing saving, rising saving, making that a part of your making that a part of your budget making that something that we always talk about the phrase pay yourself first, right? And what does that mean? Because at the end of the day, pay yourself first sounds kind of silly. You're like, oh, what do you mean pay myself first, I, you know, I have to pay my bills, I have to pay my rent and all of that stuff, we want you to make yourself a bill, we want you to say that every single month, you're going to pay yourself a certain amount of money. The thing that we want you to keep in mind, especially when it comes to saving is saving is an action saving is not an amount. It doesn't matter how much you save, it matters that you're saving. And every dollar that you put towards a savings account is $1 that you don't have to hustle for. Right. And on the other side of that the way to also save is to start thinking about how to spend in alignment with your values. Because at the end of the day to the hustle culture teaches us to produce and to consume and to produce and to consume. And it teaches us Hey, you always have to have the next thing and the way to have the next thing is to do the next thing. So how do we stop that right? How do we figure out how to spend an align with our in alignment with our values and not spend in alignment with like what the rest of society He's telling us what the rest of poker is telling us. We don't have to go on vacation every single month, we don't have to have the latest thing. We don't have to, we don't have to, like be a part of all of that. So spending in alignment with your values, and

Dyalekt:

having or being a part of any one of those things, doesn't mean we have to do all of those things. You can't have a thing you want. Where you work extra hard or extra amount of time, or do you take gigs with other people? Right? There's some stuff that you want. Yeah, you

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

know, yeah, you're gonna say, right, it's like, that's a finite period of time. That's a one time thing that is not a perpetual hustle. I want this thing. So I'm going to take an extra gig and save a little extra money. I want this thing. And it's going to end up here while because the thing about a job. Yes,

Dyalekt:

thank you is a culture requires your total fealty requires the music and requires your body, your mind and soul.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Yeah. And then the other thing is to figure out how to truly separate your work from the rest of your life. And I say this as someone who needs to tell myself this on a regular basis, especially if you're a business owner, especially if you're doing your own thing, especially if you are your own boss is it's really hard to turn it off. I remember, we don't have any of this. I wish we did. That's why we're doing this show. Right? And the thing that I remember was when I had a nine to five, I could literally turn it off. I could turn off my computer I could go home I remember I training for a frickin marathon when I had a nine to five marathon half marathon Thank you

Dyalekt:

more than one of them so that you'd like a marathon

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

I did. Well, and the way that I was training for these half marathons was I was running to work. Work was only six miles away. So I would take the extra time to run to work I would run it lunch. It became like this extra thing that I was doing

Dyalekt:

to make it up by the way Do you know that run? Can you was once part of hustle culture run commute? The idea was by taking the train every day, look at you lazy sitting on your butt while you get your transportation to work. No, you should run your behind. You would have a pagoda behind you with people in there. Is your taxi really hustling?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

No, I wasn't No, I was just I didn't have time to not run. But it was also running at lunch anyway. I don't know. That one is right. No, you're right. Ryan commuting was the thing. I was doing it because it was New York City and it was an awesome thing to do. Um, but yeah. So those are the things to really think about when it comes to combating hustle culture. Let's go to a song. I don't really dive back in we'll talk a little bit more about how to find alternatives to this whole idea of hostile culture and this idea of like having to grind and work and compete with the people who are part of your community

Dyalekt:

you're gonna keep hearing the little one in the background here. Today we are going to I guess Miami via Manhattan via j A with john you can't stop hustling we'll be back in medicine change

Unknown:

check it out. Yo cylinder garbage dumping all the money coming in. Your Gun just chillin by Mr. Johnson. We often do is feeling like you have nothing good morning. Good morning. My whole life is triple check out the Bible

Dyalekt:

That was carried out by the Miami the cat is moved down to my

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Yeah, so today we're talking about knocking the hustle because hustle culture has become very annoyed that it's even a culture.

Dyalekt:

thing that's always been a thing that has been harmful to us that we've been

Unknown:

rationalization. So yeah.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

No, I hear that well, and it was again, like, if you think about the history of the right, it was people talking about the hustle. I mean, people talking about the hustle is something that they had to do, and something that they, you know, figured out and overcame. So that was one thing. Well, then

Dyalekt:

it became glorified after that, even under a song we were just playing with it talking about, like, first of all talking about you heard that they're talking about without splitting it up that's like that. It's part of our culture also is like, you got to spend it up. You got to celebrate your successes and all that. Why are you doing this

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

again, produce, consume, produce, consume, produce, consume, right? It's this endless cycle. That's why the hustle is in perfect to do in perpetuity.

Dyalekt:

Well, I mean, you were saying before the rat race, he said, it's a rat race without a 401k. Yeah. And that's the whole thing about rat races.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Yeah, exactly. Exactly. And so how do we get out of this, right? We get out of this rat race, also, whatever you want to call it. There is this great article from psychology today that really talks about how to think about hustle, yes, we are definitely going to do that. It's called the rise and grind of hustle culture. And they have this phrase called toil, glamour, which I thought was really such a great way to describe it, right? This idea of like, hey, like, we're burned out, but you know, we're posting on Instagram that we're at work late, and we're having so much fun and blah, blah, blah, and all this stuff. You know, we brag about it. We brag about being Workaholics. Right. When did that frickin happen? I worked so hard. I worked 80 hours this week, it went from a complaint to a breath.

Dyalekt:

Yeah, and it has the suffix a Holic, which generally means not good.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Yeah, it means you're addicted to something that's not good. Yeah, it's true. And so the thing is that, how do we turn ourselves off because hustle culture also always requires to be turning ourselves on all the time. They have these two different ways to think about things they have driven versus drawn and driven is you living from the outside in, and this is also culture, this hustle culture driving you the exact photos, you unwittingly relinquish your personal power and become a slave to the internal and external pressures, such as deadlines, work demands, or pleasing friends and loved ones. You grow so accustomed to being on autopilot, that you're not tuned to your surroundings or yourself. Perhaps you hit the ground hurrying and rushing from the moment you wake up shaking your fist in the cloud, because there aren't enough hours in the day. How many times have we told ourselves that?

Dyalekt:

Yeah, you know, and another thing we're looking at is talking about some studies. Yes, studies that we're talking about how we have passion for things that they actually end up being harder, yes, requiring more effort and more stress, and they wear you down because you care about them more. The thing about the hustle culture and the hustle world of it that they try to sell you on is to be an empathetic and emotion. And to not care. Just get the test done. Because guess what? That's easy to do. Yeah. Have you gone through like serious emotional trauma, and then going back to work the next day, Yo, I went back to work on 912.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

You know what to do, what else to do, right? And

Dyalekt:

like, sitting there with myself was a lot. So I was like, I'm just gonna go and complete tasks, because I know I can complete tasks and you can get very good evening pass, and folks will value the task completion you do while you're withering away and think about it is like you said, it's not sustainable. It's not like you're just gonna be able to do it until you retire, you will break down.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Yeah, I want to shout out the article that you're referencing. It's by Chelsea Sherman. It's called grow slow or radical alternative to hustle culture. And the study really goes into this idea that it's actually harder when you're talking about it earlier. I was like, run commuting, right, which I guess was the hustle. I didn't know I was hustling.

Dyalekt:

The whole time. You know, the glamorization of mobility. Have you done that? It's cool. Ya know, a lot of this stuff like just the caveat like, like,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

yeah, yeah, exactly. Well, and it was the reason I was able to do it. I certainly don't do it now. Because I don't have to commute for one day. Yeah, exactly. But even when I technically had more time because I was working for myself, I actually had less time because my work wasn't in this compartmentalize box, I could just leave and go home too. And so the thing with the hustle, especially if you're an entrepreneur is someone who manages your own schedule, is you have to schedule time for work, right? And so this article is gross law article, it's talking about how you don't have to like, like, take your company to a million dollars in 18 months, you don't have to, like have a million dollars of revenue or have like 20 employees or whatever that is, you know, in a short period of time,

Dyalekt:

that's more record label stuff, people telling you that, you know, the only thing that matters is the first week when your record drops, the only thing that matters is it's very time based stuff. Well, you as a creative and also I guess, even as an entrepreneur are trying to do things that are timeless. Yeah, yeah.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Exactly. Like I remember when Groupon Groupon Groupon made headlines for I think getting to a billion dollars of value in 18 months so it was like the quickest company to reach a billion dollar valuation ever. Where the hell are they? No, no, no

Dyalekt:

easy, calm go first.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

So that quote was true. So driven again is living from the outside in according to Psychology Today article and drawn which I love this is living from the inside out. When you're drawn, you are a master instead of a slave to your daily life. You come from a centered, calm place that puts you in charge of your busy mind, so you don't succumb to external and internal pressures. Doing a little Caboose, you're tuned to yourself and your surroundings Exactly. In common non judgmental ways and focus on what's happening right now anchored in the present moment. And interferometer guides your life in a peaceful observing awareness of everything you do, regardless of your circumstances. your self talk is compassionate, supportive, and empowering. That sounds great. And also,

Dyalekt:

I mean, it just sounds like it's a really simple phrase that sums up all of that, what you want to do, what you want to do, and you will find if you want to do what others needed you.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

I love that I love that so much.

Dyalekt:

Do we have selfish impulses? We have times and moments of being selfish. Yeah, for the most part, we're not we want to be a part of ecosystem, we love having community, we build things for that, you know, although really real, one of the main reasons why you've got so is that it allows us to forgive ourselves for our own inaction, you know, specifically the inaction to change the horrible conditions that most of the world lives on a daily basis. You know, if poverty is a byproduct of laziness, and laziness is a moral failing, then the poor can be reimagined as people who just didn't want it. You know, rather than people who are being exploited, we even extend that some kindness to ourselves, I've been talking about this, we wrap ourselves in praise, while our bodies remain unproductive. We are our own Emperor's New Clothes, Naked and Afraid, because we're afraid to keep on hustling, because otherwise, someone's gonna get

Unknown:

shipped.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC:

Thank you for that dialog take us out.

Dyalekt:

Well, before we roll, I want to talk to folks about what we can do to deal with the idea of hostile culture within ourselves. First of all, make sure that you prioritize spending money in places that matter to you, and spending money on the folks who do the things you want to see happen to, I want you to have grace for yourself. And remember that just like you're not your network, you're not your productivity. It's okay if you didn't get things done for other people. And it's not a goal every day to do what you did on your most productive. There are days that are generative, there are days that are restorative, you need all of those. I want you to give yourself that grace and remember the big picture. Exactly. Remember what's important. Remember what's important to you. Remember what's important to me and stop pontificating and speaking I think, a couple of good facts, you can check out the show notes. If you want to read the articles, please feel free to go on iTunes, YouTube, any of the places where we're at and hate us, rate us debate us drop whatever stars that you need and whatever bars that you feel you need to say. And we're gonna play one more song before we get on out of here. This is a classic MC from Fort Wayne, Indiana named sankofa with a song called the Tour de sessile. Oh, that's perfect. So this is the thing. You want to get it done. Yeah, we want folks to love us. Yeah, we want to be able to help our community. We want to make enough money so that we can retire but we need to do it at a pace that is safe. That is healthy. That is sustained. stainable for us. So this is the chorus also from sankofa. Check you next time. If you have any questions about what's happening, or if you have a song that you would like to have played on the show, please hit us up. We're very fun

Unknown:

to say things which I don't believe that I know to say things that they will repeat. So guess what we've been in a childish kind of way. With confection loosely for batches of thoughts, a couple of lines here. It's another day, I'm just combing through the pieces that contain a stack of loosely four batches of thoughts a couple of lines here a half first, and when I'm lost, it's about a day. I'm just combing through the pieces. What are the shirts what they hate the struggle they get a couple scrapes, maybe even grace and knuckle quick to praise the base of rubble left behind invested in both sides, the death death combined with the dose of Dharma, keeping Tweedledee satisfied, deploy close up Pat in the back at a guy rebellion with a trust fund and a pair of Birkenstocks because Cotton's got played out I know what smokes in the way Get the hipster Urban Outfitters gift bag because it's fresh and nonchalantly with the zipper Mateljan notice and then nothing but mumbled nothing's about its openness. Its backstory like David Mamet made its name dropping galore the notes have annotated I can't say that's cool pretended to play the game they stay the same like the food was was mostly for batches of thoughts a couple lines here behalf first and last it's another day, I'm just combing through the pieces that sort of contain a stack of loosely four batches of thoughts a couple of lines here a half first and last, it's another day. I'm just combing through the pieces of waiting to win the lotto with the ticket I never purchased bring in heart to the beat. I speak stronger than a stack of curses. The laughter urges me to work harder right into beats and before he's on the side of the streets of kind of disease that I believe psychiatrists to homeless shelter cats in the library stay warm from the guy who says hello twice like his record state skip to the other smokers through the gas trace traces in the virus plasma clinic owners methadone clinic visitors thing that's getting its older who's which trains get adults a homeless man's blood. Like I get it taken away in handcuffs it's what season and soon enough the dance busts a walk around nameless one new Why can't trust give it another big time over in his plans Russ too much sitting around it's time to stand up second loosely for batches of thoughts a couple of lines here behalf first dammit I'm lost. It's another day. I'm just combing through the pieces that contain a stack of loose leaf with batches of thoughts a couple of lines here a half first ever not lost. It's another day. I'm just combing through the pieces that sort of beat your brain man king of a counterculture. I drop a toothpick reference and spin around a sofa giving props to those who motivated me the best that can stand my ground while the rest just ran reckless. Executive messages said a trip quick text perfectionist versus merging the mission support works great against the heart of a name will start to betray your leadership the partisan points crashed and once we get on train tracks carry freight in 95 cars cranes rack because I counted them last day to day Park glorious numbers from explorers who didn't embark into the storyline assessing and start with this one with the heads of fire up said Mr. Spock regiment star it's never been hard to set a separate book but the path of least resistance often less than that. of thoughts a couple of lines here behalf first and last it's another day. I'm just combing through the pieces that sort of loosely four batches of thoughts a couple of lines here a half first and last. It's another day. I'm just combing through the pieces